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When Your Employer Changes Your Working Hours

By: Abigail Taylor - Updated: 23 Feb 2018 | comments*Discuss
 
Working Hours Employer Change Shifts

For many people working 9 to 5 is just not a reality. Clearly, businesses need to have staff working at relevant times to meet the demands of their business (e.g. for a restaurant this might be evenings and weekends). These non-traditional working hours are to be expected by those working in some professions. However this doesn't mean that you lose the rights of 9-5 workers.

Check Your Contract

For any issue regarding your employment, it is really important to look at your contract.
  • You should have been provided with a copy of your contract at the point when you first signed it (started your employment).
  • If you were not provided with a copy, ask for one.
  • If you have lost your copy, you are still entitled to see your contract which your employer should hold in your employee file.
  • Be aware that not all employee records will be held "onsite" at your place of work and so such a request may take a few days.
  • If the contract refers to any other procedures (such as disciplinary procedures) or terms and conditions of employment, this forms part of your contract and you are entitled to see these documents too.

Fixed Days vs Shift Work

The main difference you will usually find between fixed day and shift work (such as in restaurants) is that if you have fixed days, your contract will usually specify exactly what days and times you are expected to work; it may even tell you how long you are allowed to take for your lunch break. If you work shifts where your employer puts up a rota to tell you when you are working, your hours/days of work are usually not specified in your contract.

Hours Stated in Your Contract

The first thing to look at is the number of working hours stated in your contract. This is the number of hours that you are expected to work. Your employer must give you at least that number of hours. There is a precedent for employers promising full time employment but only putting a limited number of hours on your contract. Most of the time you will be given more hours as promised. However be aware that this is not a requirement - your employer only has to give you the minimum number stated on your contract. It is important when signing your contract to check that you are happy to only receive the number of hours stated in it, as that is all that you are guaranteed! Note that if you choose to "shift-swap" with another employee and end up with fewer hours than stated in your contract, that is your choice, and your employer is not obliged to give you additional hours to make up the deficit.

I have a contract for 21 hours and my employer has just told us we are having a delivery every day Mon-Sunday for xmas. They have said if we don't work these days we will be disciplined.

I work Monday to Friday and they have told us we have to work Saturday and Sunday night. If we have a contract of 21 hours do we have to work over our contract hours? Can I refuse to work over my contract - I have 3 young children?

  • You cannot be forced to work over the number of hours in your contract and may legally refuse to do so.
  • If you do not work the full number of hours stated in your contract (without good reason such as illness/bereavement etc) then your employer may discipline you.
  • If you object to the number of hours you have been allocated, it is always best to speak to your employer as soon as possible so they can reallocate hours.
  • You cannot simply work Mon-Fri and then say you have done your hours so you are not working at the weekend. Your employer may choose to reduce your hours by reducing your hours during the week, and it is entirely up to them as to which shifts they remove to reduce the hours given to you.

Which Shifts You Work

I've been working for a company for 11 years since it started. I have been working day shifts because they told me that the night shift is too risky for ladies.

Now they said I must work the night shift without any reason or agreement. I haven't worked a night shift before and I have two children who are 5 & 9. My husband works nights so cannot look after them.

  • What times/days you have to work will depend on your contract.
  • If your contract states that you are available to work any time, unfortunately you can be called upon to work on different days/hours than your usual work pattern.
  • If your availability has changed, you need to discuss this with your employer, and a new contract may need to be signed with this change reflected.

I have been working late afternoons and evenings into the night due to the nature of my work. The place I work has very bad public transport connections and absolutely no public transport after my work finishes.

Now my employer has asked me to come in early one day a week because it would suit them better. This would be really difficult for me due to transport problems. Can my employer force me to change my hours and can they give me a warning or fire me if I can't accommodate them?

If your contract limits your working hours/days (for example from 9am to 5pm), your employer can request that you change these hours, but cannot force you to do so. It is always worth discussing any requested changes with your employer as you may be able to agree with your employer a compromise that suits you both better.

I work for a care company and work 6 days and 1 evening, I have 2 children under the age of 16. Today I was told that next week and future weeks I will be doing 4 days and 2 nights but nobody else has had this text.
Can my manager do this? Really worry as I have nobody to watch my kids at nights.

Clearly child care is a major concern in relation to working hours for many people and so if you have any concerns this should be discussed with your employer, as it may be that there is another employee who is more able to work evenings/nights. As explained above however, if your contract states that you can work these times, your employer may rota you to do so and require you to work these times.

Flexible Working

All workers have the right to request flexible working to accommodate other commitments. To have the right to request flexible working you must:
  • a) have worked for the company for at least 26 weeks
  • b) not have made a flexible working request already in the last 12 months

However be aware that your employer does not have to agree to this. They must however give your request serious consideration and give you the reasons (in writing) for any request being denied. In some businesses, this simply isn't feasible, so be reasonable and try to agree times that suit both you and your employer (for example still working some evenings, but perhaps starting at 5:30/6pm so that you can pick up your children from school and take them to a relative/friend's house who will babysit for you.)

Note the flexible working policy has now been extended to all workers and not just carers of children.

Notice of working hours/changes

Your employer must give you reasonable notice of any changes to your working hours, such as cancelling your shifts. They may request last minute changes (such as ringing you that morning to say that they do not require you to work) and you can choose to agree to this change. However if you are not given reasonable notice of your shift being cancelled/shortened, you can politely refuse this reduction in your hours.

How much notice is "reasonable"? There is no law simply defining reasonable. However your contract may state this. In most cases, a minimum of 12 hours notice would be expected as reasonable notice to cancel a shift. It may be reasonable to have more notice of a requirement to work (rather than not work).

My employer normally gives out the next week rota normally on the Thursday. It seems to be getting later and later. It is now Friday and we still haven't had the rota for next week. Can they do that?

It is often a problem with those who rely on a rota for their working days / hours that the rota of when you may be working is often not put up until near the end of the week before, giving you only a few days notice of any early-week shift. Unfortunately again, unless specified in your contract, the only guide is what is "reasonable". If this causes you problems however, ask your employer about this. Often the rota will be in draft form "subject to minor alterations" many weeks in advance. If you will not be in work on days to know when you are working, you can also always ring up to ask. Obviously if rotas are put up last minute across several weeks, you may need to speak to your employer. However if it is a one-off and only a day later, do be reasonable - has your manager been away ill or had another reason to not be able to put up the rota as early as normal that week? If the late notice causes you substantial problems, communicate with your Manager.

Breaches of contract

If your employer is in breach of your employment contract (e.g. not giving you your amount of contracted hours), what can you do?

  1. The first step is always to talk to your employer. It may be a simple mistake which can easily be rectified by amending the rota
  2. If you are unhappy with your manager's response to your complaint, follow your company's complaints procedure. This often requires you to forward your complaint to a more senior manager. If you do not know your employer's complaints procedure, ask to see a copy of it. If your company has an HR Department, they may also be able to provide you with guidance on the procedures. You are often entitled to have a supporter present, such as another employee, which can be reassuring at any meeting.
  3. It is always best to try to resolve matters "in house" with your employer. If you are not able to do so, you can take your employer to an Employment Tribunal. Be aware that whilst you can't be fired for doing so, this may make for an awkward working environment if you are still employed at the firm.

Employment Tribunals

  • An employment tribunal is an independent body that will assess your complaint and may make your employer pay you compensation if they think your rights have been breached.
  • You usually have to apply to the employment tribunal within 3 months of the incident you are complaining about arising (e.g. 3 months after you were unfairly fired).
  • To refer a matter to an employment tribunal, you must download and fill in a form which can be found at www.justice.gov.uk. There are also guidance notes online to assist you with filling in your application. The form can be filled in and submitted online, or printed and returned by post to your local employment tribunal office.
  • If you want help in referring your complaint to an employment tribunal, you can contact your local Citizens Advice Bureau who will provide you with free advice. If you are a member of a trade union, they may also be able to assist you.

Zero Hours Contracts

If you are on a zero hours contract, much of the above may not apply to your circumstances. We have a guide on Zero Hours Contracts here, which we hope you will find useful.

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I have worked for the same company for almost 15 years. My working contract has been 16 hours since July 2012 due to having a baby. Since my child started school in sept 2016, I have been working set shifts , agreed with my boss of 9-2.30 school hours 3 days a week.Last year I requested for one or two extra shifts a week , so I could take time off without using holiday , as there isn’t enough to cover my child’s holidays from school. The manager at the time agreed & was quite happy to give me 1 or 2 extra shifts of 9-2.30. Then another person took over the rota & again carried on giving me the extra 1 or 2 shifts up until December last year . The old boss cane back & started doing the Rotas again , I have given him a list of every holiday & week off requested & every shift I can work up until September 2018. Again with the request for an extra 1 or 2 shifts a week. He has now said no. If I want extra It will have to be evenings . He said my shift of 9-2.30 is of no use & it does nothing to help cover anything. I don’t understand why since May 2017 I have been given these shifts & now because he’s back he won’t give them to me. Can he do this? Is there anything I could do?
MrsHop1980 - 23-Feb-18 @ 12:48 PM
I have worked for the same company for almost 15 years. My working contract has been 16 hours since July 2012 due to having a baby. Since my child started school in sept 2016, I have been working set shifts , agreed with my boss of 9-2.30 school hours 3 days a week.Last year I requested for one or two extra shifts a week , so I could take time off without using holiday , as there isn’t enough to cover my child’s holidays from school. The manager at the time agreed & was quite happy to give me 1 or 2 extra shifts of 9-2.30. Then another person took over the rota & again carried on giving me the extra 1 or 2 shifts up until December last year . The old boss cane back & started doing the Rotas again , I have given him a list of every holiday & week off requested & every shift I can work up until September 2018. Again with the request for an extra 1 or 2 shifts a week. He has now said no. If I want extra It will have to be evenings . He said my shift of 9-2.30 is of no use & it does nothing to help cover anything. I don’t understand why since May 2017 I have been given these shifts & now because he’s back he won’t give them to me. Can he do this? Is there anything I could do?
MrsHop1980 - 23-Feb-18 @ 8:17 AM
I have worked for the same company for almost 15 years. My working contract has been 16 hours since July 2012 due to having a baby. Since my child started school in sept 2016, I have been working set shifts , agreed with my boss of 9-2.30 school hours 3 days a week.Last year I requested for one or two extra shifts a week , so I could take time off without using holiday , as there isn’t enough to cover my child’s holidays from school. The manager at the time agreed & was quite happy to give me 1 or 2 extra shifts of 9-2.30. Then another person took over the rota & again carried on giving me the extra 1 or 2 shifts up until December last year . The old boss cane back & started doing the Rotas again , I have given him a list of every holiday & week off requested & every shift I can work up until September 2018. Again with the request for an extra 1 or 2 shifts a week. He has now said no. If I want extra It will have to be evenings . He said my shift of 9-2.30 is of no use & it does nothing to help cover anything. I don’t understand why since May 2017 I have been given these shifts & now because he’s back he won’t give them to me. Can he do this? Is there anything I could do?
MrsHop1980 - 23-Feb-18 @ 7:47 AM
I have worked for the same company for almost 15 years. My working contract has been 16 hours since July 2012 due to having a baby. Since my child started school in sept 2016, I have been working set shifts , agreed with my boss of 9-2.30 school hours 3 days a week.Last year I requested for one or two extra shifts a week , so I could take time off without using holiday , as there isn’t enough to cover my child’s holidays from school. The manager at the time agreed & was quite happy to give me 1 or 2 extra shifts of 9-2.30. Then another person took over the rota & again carried on giving me the extra 1 or 2 shifts up until December last year . The old boss cane back & started doing the Rotas again , I have given him a list of every holiday & week off requested & every shift I can work up until September 2018. Again with the request for an extra 1 or 2 shifts a week. He has now said no. If I want extra It will have to be evenings . He said my shift of 9-2.30 is of no use & it does nothing to help cover anything. I don’t understand why since May 2017 I have been given these shifts & now because he’s back he won’t give them to me. Can he do this? Is there anything I could do?
MrsHop1980 - 23-Feb-18 @ 7:31 AM
I have worked for a company for 1 year with a start time of 6.00 am and work have informed me verbally only , that they now require me to start @ 5.00 pm. My contracted hours are staying the same 40hrs and the same days . My works contract says they can ask me to work any 5 days out of 7 and at any time and shifts they require. But does not mention what notice (time) they are required to give me to change my shift pattern ? I have read on another website that work have to give me a minimum of 7 Days notice in writing before forcing me to do this new start time ? Any advice and help in this matter would be gratefully appreciated as I have only a few days left before it starts , thanks K
Mickey - 22-Feb-18 @ 7:56 PM
have been working for same company for 5 years, 16 hours a week over shifts, however it was agreed by manager, but not put in writing that i could work 2 full days on set days, this has been the same days for last 3 years.i am a carer for elderly father and need the set days to work with other carers,work has told me in two weeks time i need to change back to 3 days a week, shift patterns.Can they do this after it was agreed 3 years ago.
cb. - 22-Feb-18 @ 3:21 PM
Rick - Your Question:
Hi, we are on flexible working contracts which stats - We operate a 24 hour day, 7 day week business & in order to be there for our customers whenthey need us, we operate a flexible shift pattern scheme. You will work your contracted hoursof 37.5 hours per week. You will be required to work evenings and weekends as part of this shiftpattern and this may also mean you are required to work on English bank and public holidaysfrom time to time depending on the shift pattern. Changes to your shift pattern will becommunicated to you giving you 4 weeks’ notice.The Issue I have is that for the past 2 years I have always been on 8 hour shifts with a 30 minute break but the business is proposing to change this to flexible hours as I may work 12 hours one day and 4 the next. Is this allowed as I've been on flexible days but set hours per day for over 2 years or do they need to offer me a new contract with a change of terms and conditions?Thanks

Our Response:
From what you've written about your contract, it doesn't specify how many hours you will work each day, so it may be difficult to object unfortunately.
SafeWorkers - 21-Feb-18 @ 3:43 PM
Hi, we are on flexible working contracts which stats - We operate a 24 hour day, 7 day week business & in order to be there for our customers when they need us, we operate a flexible shift pattern scheme. You will work your contracted hours of 37.5 hours per week. You will be required to work evenings and weekends as part of this shift pattern and this may also mean you are required to work on English bank and public holidays from time to time depending on the shift pattern. Changes to your shift pattern will be communicated to you giving you 4 weeks’ notice. The Issue I have is that for the past 2 years I have always been on 8 hour shifts with a 30 minute break but the business is proposing to change this to flexible hours as I may work 12 hours one day and 4 the next. Is this allowed as I've been on flexible days but set hours per day for over 2 years or do they need to offer me a new contract with a change of terms and conditions? Thanks
Rick - 21-Feb-18 @ 12:21 PM
Gini - Your Question:
My employee works 8 hrs a week. She is a teacher. Now she wants to work 6 hrs. I can’t find another person to work for 2 hrs only. Can I ask her to leave job so I can replace her with another Williams bag to do 8 hrs

Our Response:
As you have a good business reason for refusing the request to work 6 hours instead of 8 you should explain this to your employee. This gives her the chance to accept the refusal and continue working 8 hours, or to leave.
SafeWorkers - 20-Feb-18 @ 12:51 PM
I work in a children’s home. The young person I look after may go away for the weekend so they cancel staff shifts at short notice, but then tell us that we owe them hours. These are then sometimes carried over into the next month (we are paid 169hrs per month plus any overtime). Can they cancel our shifts and then say we owe them hrs back, is this not that they are not providing the hrs, especially if they are still accepting money for the placement as though the child is still there..
Vicks - 17-Feb-18 @ 10:57 PM
My employee works 8 hrs a week. She is a teacher. Now she wants to work 6 hrs. I can’t find another person to work for 2 hrs only. Can I ask her to leave job so I can replace her with another Williams bag to do 8 hrs
Gini - 16-Feb-18 @ 1:47 AM
she - Your Question:
Hi I finished my nightshift this morning and was phoned by my employer this afternoon telling me that my scheduled admin day tomorrow had been cancelled (7.5Hours) and that I had to work a 13 hour shift on the ward. My contract is 37.5 hour per week internal rotation these hours are usually spread over a four week period in which we can work more or less than 37.5 hours a week but show a cumulative total at the end of the month which should balance out. my cumulative total is -7 which means I will have worked 7 hours over my contracted hours. My employee is also insisting that I cancel my admin day for next week to cover this shift. I am usually very flexible and I am willing to do the morning shift but as I have childcare and appointments in the afternoon am I within my rights to refuse to work the extra shift?

Our Response:
Without seeing your contract it's difficult to comment on this effectively. Are you at the end of the four week period? Or is there still time to average out your hours?The above article should help with your question.
SafeWorkers - 14-Feb-18 @ 10:07 AM
Hi i finished my nightshift this morning and was phoned by my employer this afternoon telling me that my scheduled admin day tomorrow had been cancelled (7.5Hours) and that i had to work a 13 hour shift on the ward. My contract is 37.5 hour per week internal rotation these hours are usually spread over a four week period in which we can work more or less than 37.5 hours a week but show a cumulative total at the end of the month which should balance out. my cumulative total is -7 which means i will have worked 7 hours over my contracted hours. My employee is also insisting that i cancel my admin day for next week to cover this shift. I am usually very flexible and i am willing to do the morning shift but as i have childcare and appointments in the afternoon am i within my rights to refuse to work the extra shift?
she - 12-Feb-18 @ 8:42 PM
Hartley - Your Question:
So due to a health problem my employer has now asked me to change shift pattern from 4 days 5off 5days 4off 5days to Monday to Friday 3pm-11pm abs I can’t do nights. the night shift starts from 19:00 - 7am surly working past this time is classed as nights right? Also how long would they have to give notice for this change? Thanks

Our Response:
To be considered a night worker you must regularly work at least 3 hours during the ‘night period'. The night period is 11pm to 6am, so working from 3pm to 11pm would not be classed as night shift.
SafeWorkers - 12-Feb-18 @ 2:03 PM
So due to a health problem my employer has now asked me to change shift pattern from 4 days 5off 5days 4off 5days to Monday to Friday 3pm-11pm abs I can’t do nights.... the night shift starts from 19:00 - 7am surly working past this time is classed as nights right? Also how long would they have to give notice for this change? Thanks
Hartley - 9-Feb-18 @ 11:03 PM
Raff - Your Question:
My agree working day is 7.00 to 15.30 and Finnish on a Friday 7.00 to 12.00. Now the new supervisor has ask me to change to 7.00 to 15.00 and stay on a Friday to 7.00 to 14.00. Can I say no as it hasn't changed from 5 yrs working here. Any advice please.

Our Response:
What does your contract say?
SafeWorkers - 9-Feb-18 @ 3:43 PM
My agreeworking day is 7.00 to 15.30 and Finnish on a Friday7.00 to 12.00. Now the new supervisor has ask me to change to 7.00 to 15.00 and stay on a Friday to 7.00 to 14.00 . Can I say no as it hasn't changed from 5 yrs working here . Any advice please.
Raff - 9-Feb-18 @ 7:40 AM
Christopher - Your Question:
I was working for a company in one branch and a few years ago got transferred to a new one. Previously I worked shift work but now I am expected to do a shift pattern which has a 10 week shift pattern of which two of the weeks are Relief. In these two Relief weeks my company can rota me to work any shifts they feel like, to use up the 8 days I owe them over this period. This sometimes means switching from days to nights 3 to 4 times in quick succession. I have told my company that I never agreed to work the relief pattern and it isn't part of my existing contract so I should either not have to work it or be paid more to work it. They keep arguing that my rota is non-contractual, but surely it must be?

Our Response:
We can't really comment on this without information about your contract. It might be worth getting someone to look at your contract for you (Citizens' Advice, ACAS etc).
SafeWorkers - 6-Feb-18 @ 2:57 PM
I was working for a company in one branch and a few years ago got transferred to a new one. Previously I worked shift work but now I am expected to do a shift pattern which has a 10 week shift pattern of which two of the weeks are Relief. In these two Relief weeks my company can rota me to work any shifts they feel like, to use up the 8 days I owe them over this period. This sometimes means switching from days to nights 3 to 4 times in quick succession. I have told my company that I never agreed to work the relief pattern and it isn't part of my existing contract so I should either not have to work it or be paid more to work it. They keep arguing that my rota is non-contractual, but surely it must be?
Christopher - 6-Feb-18 @ 7:46 AM
mae - Your Question:
I worked in my company two years up to present. I have two outlets and im working 4 hours everyday in every outlets but there is an accident that my first outlet is temporary close because of some reasons, but my employer gives me only 4 hours duty in my one outlet. Is it reasonable that I have only 4 hours duty everyday??

Our Response:
What does your contract say?
SafeWorkers - 5-Feb-18 @ 3:42 PM
Please can you advise me. I live in the UK. I was employed on a service run by two orgs working in partnership. Organisation A was subcontracted by Organisation B. Org A were my employers and I was working 4 days a week. Org B one day asked me if I could do some work with me urgently as they were short staffed. The manager said he will pay me for my time verbally. Over email he detailed thw work they want me to do and how long they expect the task to take. I was scheduled to undertake 3 1.5hour GP visits. 1 of those visits were cancelled by the manager less than an hour before the planned visit time. Now he is refusing to pay me for that visit his excuse being "i notified you just before you left". I had no contract with them as it was one off. He didnt specify I would only get paid for attended visits nor was there any clause about notice. My point is I booked that time for the visit, he cancelled it because he got the opening times wrong, I was not able to book anything else in that time. What are my rights in this situation? What can I do as there is no contract? Please advise.
Rhez - 3-Feb-18 @ 11:52 PM
I worked in my company two years up to present. I have two outlets and im working 4 hours everyday in every outlets but there is an accident that my first outlet is temporary close because of some reasons, but my employer gives me only 4 hours duty in my one outlet. Is it reasonable that i have only 4 hours duty everyday??
mae - 3-Feb-18 @ 12:14 PM
Dean - Your Question:
I work for a large company and some days I M told they are closing early and that I'll have to make up the hours from that shift another day which all add up.I'm contracted to 38h a week so if they send me home 4 hours early one day the next week they say I owe them 4 hours which is being added all up so some owe 20h plus over weeks and weeks Are they slowed to do this ?

Our Response:
No, if you're contract is for 38 hours a week, that is what you should be paid.
SafeWorkers - 2-Feb-18 @ 10:22 AM
Sjb - Your Question:
My employer has told me that I'm in breach of the data protection if I discuss my rota with someone else is this true

Our Response:
No, that sounds like it is taking the principles of the data protection act too far. Most employers encourage discussion of rotas for shift swapping etc.
SafeWorkers - 31-Jan-18 @ 12:37 PM
I work for a large company and some days I M told they are closing early and that I'll have to make up the hours from that shift another day which all add up. I'm contracted to 38h a week so if they send me home 4 hours early one day the next week they say I owe them 4 hours which is being added all up so some owe 20h plus over weeks and weeks Are they slowed to do this ?
Dean - 31-Jan-18 @ 10:51 AM
My employer has told me that I'm in breach of the data protection if I discuss my rota with someone else is this true
Sjb - 30-Jan-18 @ 3:48 PM
SPL - Your Question:
For 9 years I have worked permanent flexi- time on a part-time 18 hour per week contract. My employer is now forcing me to work to set days each week which means I can no longer do this job as I require the flexi-time to work alongside another flexi-time job I have. They have sent this for consultation, I realise they have not done anything wrong and are following correct procedure but if this was to be pushed through and they can change the terms of my contract am I entitled to redundancy due to the fact I am unable to continue working with the new terms of the contract.

Our Response:
If the new terms are necessary for the business, there may be a case for redundancy Please see our guide here
SafeWorkers - 29-Jan-18 @ 11:25 AM
For 9 years I have worked permanent flexi- time on a part-time 18 hour per week contract. My employer is now forcing me to work to set days each week which means I can no longer do this job as I require the flexi-time to work alongside another flexi-time job I have. They have sent this for consultation, I realise they have not done anything wrong and are following correct procedure but if this was to be pushed through and they can change the terms of my contract am I entitled to redundancy due to the fact I am unable to continue working with the new terms of the contract.
SPL - 26-Jan-18 @ 3:56 PM
I have worked for my company for 8 years on a 16 hr contract, they want me to become a key holder which means I have to run the shop and work every Sunday and Bank holidays I have only ever worked weekdays and have refused as I don't think I could manage the job so they now want to cut my hours so they can employ someone else, can they do this ?
Chrissy - 25-Jan-18 @ 7:40 PM
Panda - Your Question:
Hi, I came back from Mat leave last May and filled out a flexible hour contact. My request was 2 days and 16 hours. They agreed to this. Now they have asked me to change my Monday to a Friday. I have agreed to change this. But They have now said to me they need me on a Wednesday can they do this? I have explained that I cant get childcare? I have worked for the company 8 years before going on Mat leave, hoe much notice do they have to giv3 for change of days?

Our Response:
Check to see whether your request for flexible working was for a trial period etc. If there is nothing that states the arrangement is for a trial period or temporary, then you can assume that a flexible working request that has been agreed creates a permanent change to your contract. If your new contract actually states which two days you work, your employer is in breach of the contract. Please see our guide to Objecting to changes in your Contract
SafeWorkers - 24-Jan-18 @ 12:32 PM
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