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When Your Employer Changes Your Working Hours

By: Abigail Taylor - Updated: 10 Dec 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Working Hours Employer Change Shifts

For many people working 9 to 5 is just not a reality. Clearly, businesses need to have staff working at relevant times to meet the demands of their business (e.g. for a restaurant this might be evenings and weekends). These non-traditional working hours are to be expected by those working in some professions. However this doesn't mean that you lose the rights of 9-5 workers.

Check Your Contract

For any issue regarding your employment, it is really important to look at your contract.
  • You should have been provided with a copy of your contract at the point when you first signed it (started your employment).
  • If you were not provided with a copy, ask for one.
  • If you have lost your copy, you are still entitled to see your contract which your employer should hold in your employee file.
  • Be aware that not all employee records will be held "onsite" at your place of work and so such a request may take a few days.
  • If the contract refers to any other procedures (such as disciplinary procedures) or terms and conditions of employment, this forms part of your contract and you are entitled to see these documents too.

Fixed Days vs Shift Work

The main difference you will usually find between fixed day and shift work (such as in restaurants) is that if you have fixed days, your contract will usually specify exactly what days and times you are expected to work; it may even tell you how long you are allowed to take for your lunch break. If you work shifts where your employer puts up a rota to tell you when you are working, your hours/days of work are usually not specified in your contract.

Hours Stated in Your Contract

The first thing to look at is the number of working hours stated in your contract. This is the number of hours that you are expected to work. Your employer must give you at least that number of hours. There is a precedent for employers promising full time employment but only putting a limited number of hours on your contract. Most of the time you will be given more hours as promised. However be aware that this is not a requirement - your employer only has to give you the minimum number stated on your contract. It is important when signing your contract to check that you are happy to only receive the number of hours stated in it, as that is all that you are guaranteed! Note that if you choose to "shift-swap" with another employee and end up with fewer hours than stated in your contract, that is your choice, and your employer is not obliged to give you additional hours to make up the deficit.

I have a contract for 21 hours and my employer has just told us we are having a delivery every day Mon-Sunday for xmas. They have said if we don't work these days we will be disciplined.

I work Monday to Friday and they have told us we have to work Saturday and Sunday night. If we have a contract of 21 hours do we have to work over our contract hours? Can I refuse to work over my contract - I have 3 young children?

  • You cannot be forced to work over the number of hours in your contract and may legally refuse to do so.
  • If you do not work the full number of hours stated in your contract (without good reason such as illness/bereavement etc) then your employer may discipline you.
  • If you object to the number of hours you have been allocated, it is always best to speak to your employer as soon as possible so they can reallocate hours.
  • You cannot simply work Mon-Fri and then say you have done your hours so you are not working at the weekend. Your employer may choose to reduce your hours by reducing your hours during the week, and it is entirely up to them as to which shifts they remove to reduce the hours given to you.

Which Shifts You Work

I've been working for a company for 11 years since it started. I have been working day shifts because they told me that the night shift is too risky for ladies.

Now they said I must work the night shift without any reason or agreement. I haven't worked a night shift before and I have two children who are 5 & 9. My husband works nights so cannot look after them.

  • What times/days you have to work will depend on your contract.
  • If your contract states that you are available to work any time, unfortunately you can be called upon to work on different days/hours than your usual work pattern.
  • If your availability has changed, you need to discuss this with your employer, and a new contract may need to be signed with this change reflected.

I have been working late afternoons and evenings into the night due to the nature of my work. The place I work has very bad public transport connections and absolutely no public transport after my work finishes.

Now my employer has asked me to come in early one day a week because it would suit them better. This would be really difficult for me due to transport problems. Can my employer force me to change my hours and can they give me a warning or fire me if I can't accommodate them?

If your contract limits your working hours/days (for example from 9am to 5pm), your employer can request that you change these hours, but cannot force you to do so. It is always worth discussing any requested changes with your employer as you may be able to agree with your employer a compromise that suits you both better.

I work for a care company and work 6 days and 1 evening, I have 2 children under the age of 16. Today I was told that next week and future weeks I will be doing 4 days and 2 nights but nobody else has had this text.
Can my manager do this? Really worry as I have nobody to watch my kids at nights.

Clearly child care is a major concern in relation to working hours for many people and so if you have any concerns this should be discussed with your employer, as it may be that there is another employee who is more able to work evenings/nights. As explained above however, if your contract states that you can work these times, your employer may rota you to do so and require you to work these times.

Flexible Working

All workers have the right to request flexible working to accommodate other commitments. To have the right to request flexible working you must:
  • a) have worked for the company for at least 26 weeks
  • b) not have made a flexible working request already in the last 12 months

However be aware that your employer does not have to agree to this. They must however give your request serious consideration and give you the reasons (in writing) for any request being denied. In some businesses, this simply isn't feasible, so be reasonable and try to agree times that suit both you and your employer (for example still working some evenings, but perhaps starting at 5:30/6pm so that you can pick up your children from school and take them to a relative/friend's house who will babysit for you.)

Note the flexible working policy has now been extended to all workers and not just carers of children.

Notice of working hours/changes

Your employer must give you reasonable notice of any changes to your working hours, such as cancelling your shifts. They may request last minute changes (such as ringing you that morning to say that they do not require you to work) and you can choose to agree to this change. However if you are not given reasonable notice of your shift being cancelled/shortened, you can politely refuse this reduction in your hours.

How much notice is "reasonable"? There is no law simply defining reasonable. However your contract may state this. In most cases, a minimum of 12 hours notice would be expected as reasonable notice to cancel a shift. It may be reasonable to have more notice of a requirement to work (rather than not work).

My employer normally gives out the next week rota normally on the Thursday. It seems to be getting later and later. It is now Friday and we still haven't had the rota for next week. Can they do that?

It is often a problem with those who rely on a rota for their working days / hours that the rota of when you may be working is often not put up until near the end of the week before, giving you only a few days notice of any early-week shift. Unfortunately again, unless specified in your contract, the only guide is what is "reasonable". If this causes you problems however, ask your employer about this. Often the rota will be in draft form "subject to minor alterations" many weeks in advance. If you will not be in work on days to know when you are working, you can also always ring up to ask. Obviously if rotas are put up last minute across several weeks, you may need to speak to your employer. However if it is a one-off and only a day later, do be reasonable - has your manager been away ill or had another reason to not be able to put up the rota as early as normal that week? If the late notice causes you substantial problems, communicate with your Manager.

Breaches of contract

If your employer is in breach of your employment contract (e.g. not giving you your amount of contracted hours), what can you do?

  1. The first step is always to talk to your employer. It may be a simple mistake which can easily be rectified by amending the rota
  2. If you are unhappy with your manager's response to your complaint, follow your company's complaints procedure. This often requires you to forward your complaint to a more senior manager. If you do not know your employer's complaints procedure, ask to see a copy of it. If your company has an HR Department, they may also be able to provide you with guidance on the procedures. You are often entitled to have a supporter present, such as another employee, which can be reassuring at any meeting.
  3. It is always best to try to resolve matters "in house" with your employer. If you are not able to do so, you can take your employer to an Employment Tribunal. Be aware that whilst you can't be fired for doing so, this may make for an awkward working environment if you are still employed at the firm.

Employment Tribunals

  • An employment tribunal is an independent body that will assess your complaint and may make your employer pay you compensation if they think your rights have been breached.
  • You usually have to apply to the employment tribunal within 3 months of the incident you are complaining about arising (e.g. 3 months after you were unfairly fired).
  • To refer a matter to an employment tribunal, you must download and fill in a form which can be found at www.justice.gov.uk. There are also guidance notes online to assist you with filling in your application. The form can be filled in and submitted online, or printed and returned by post to your local employment tribunal office.
  • If you want help in referring your complaint to an employment tribunal, you can contact your local Citizens Advice Bureau who will provide you with free advice. If you are a member of a trade union, they may also be able to assist you.

Zero Hours Contracts

If you are on a zero hours contract, much of the above may not apply to your circumstances. We have a guide on Zero Hours Contracts here, which we hope you will find useful.

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Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
Hi all, I've been working 14 hours on Sat-Sunday with my current employer for the last 10 years. The last 4 years has been in the office doing accounting based role. We're now (part-timers only) being asked to split our shift across 3 days so we'recoming in for 4.5 hours p/day, as a minimum. They've said if we cannot fulfill the times required from us they'll move us to another part of the business (which may include retail floor) where they can accommodate our hours. My query is: 1) Can they split up our hours, especially as I've been working exclusively Sat-Sunday for the last 10 years? My contract just states 14 hours, nothing about days or anything. Not sure, if I've read this correctly somewhere (possibly in A-Level Law) but i was under the impression that even if a contract doesn't state something or otherwise, if you do it for a certain amount of time it can amount to an agreement. Can we argue that here? 2) My banding is level 2 - which means I am described as a specialist and job description specifically states "Accounting and reporting" responsibilities - can they just decide to move me around and possible to the shop floor? 3) As part of the re-shuffle they've decided that only part-timers will be moved to other departments (3 of us in total) the full-timers are not affected by any changes - can we appeal on grounds of discrimination against part-time workers? The management have been very unprofessional towards us (all part-time and full-timers) and have been watching us on CCTV (without reason), have been making horrible comments about us to other members of the office and retail floor, to top it off now this with a simple explanation of "better trying to serve business needs". Can we be due for receiving any redundancy pay that they're trying to avoid? Any help and advice would be much appreciated. Thank you!
AB - 10-Dec-17 @ 3:16 PM
My girlfriend works at a pub and something her manager makes her work 2-3 hours after the hours she’s supposed to work according to the rota . We always have to cancel plans and appointments due to this . Is there any legal actions that can be taken against this ? Other workers are allowed to go home when their shift has finished but she has to stay over most of the time.
Alex - 8-Dec-17 @ 10:49 PM
lisa - Your Question:
Hi, my daughter has a 16 hrs contract at work, she has 2 children age 9&7, therefore claim child tax credits, the company are now putting her in for longer hours due to the Xmas period, some weeks only 1.5 hours over but other weeks 9.5 hours over, this affects her credits a lot and where this may be only until Jan, she could lose out on a lot of money from her credits for up to 8 weeks, she has discussed this with her manager but they don't want to know, the last time she did over her hours she lost out nearly £80 a week, but only gained around £20 -£30 doing the overtime, can she basically be forced to work these extra hours?Thank youlisa

Our Response:
This depends on her employment contract - if contractually she is obliged to work additional hours over busy periods like christmas there isn't much that she can do. The Tax Credit situation is evened out over the course of the year so she should actually lose int total.
SafeWorkers - 8-Dec-17 @ 12:11 PM
Hi, my daughter has a 16 hrs contract at work, she has 2 children age 9&7, therefore claim child tax credits, the company are now putting her in for longer hours due to the Xmas period, some weeks only 1.5 hours over but other weeks 9.5 hours over, this affects her credits a lot and where this may be only until Jan,she could lose out on a lot of money from her credits for up to 8 weeks, she has discussed this with her manager but they don't want to know, the last time she did over her hours she lost out nearly £80 a week, but only gained around £20 -£30 doing the overtime,can she basically be forced to work these extra hours? Thank you lisa
lisa - 7-Dec-17 @ 10:24 AM
Dawn - Your Question:
I work 7:30 to 4:30 Monday to Friday. My employer has decided that we need to be open m-w until 7:30 and wants me to comp my time. I was hired at those hours and was told that my contract said and other duties assigned. But these are not duties but hours! I have a life and don't want to stay at work that late. What can I do

Our Response:
If your hours are stated in your contract, your employer cannot change these without your consent. Changing your hours permanently cannot be covered by a "other duties as assigned" clause in your contract. See our guide on Objecting to Changes in your Employment Contract for more information.
SafeWorkers - 6-Dec-17 @ 2:28 PM
Andy - Your Question:
My contract says I need to work within opening hours.I have worked mon to fri for 2years. They now want me to start a half day on Saturday, I am happy to do this but have plans and appointments made over next three Saturdays till Xmas is this reasonable amount of time of notice as no mention of this before now.can I refuse until after Xmas.

Our Response:
Unfortunately if your contract says you have to work during opening hours and your place of work is open on a Saturday then you may have to work as requested. Assuming you work in retail, you can expect to be asked to work during at least one of the weekend days in each of the weeks leading up to Chrtismas.
SafeWorkers - 6-Dec-17 @ 9:59 AM
I work 7:30 to 4:30 Monday to Friday. My employer has decided that we need to be open m-w until 7:30 and wants me to comp my time. I was hired at those hours and was told that my contract said and other duties assigned. But these are not duties but hours! I have a life and don't want to stay at work that late. What can I do
Dawn - 5-Dec-17 @ 9:02 PM
barney - Your Question:
My daughter has an 8 hour a week contract working Saturdays and Sundays, the employer puts the rota up on a Sunday for the following week. My daughter checks the rota and notes her working times. This week while she was in college all week they changed the already posted rota resulting in her shift changing. They said she has to come into work every day to check the rota - it would take her an hour every day to travel to work to do this. Shouldn’t they inform her of shift changes? Can they force you to come in to check a rota that is already posted?

Our Response:
That's ridiculous and unreasonable, you wouldn't believe how many employers still do this. With messaging technology nowadays, it is really simple to keep people informed...suggest a facebook page or messenger group, whatsapp group, text messaging, emails. If the manager can't get to grips with new technology get your daughter or someone who works there more often to take it to senior management or the chief exex etc
SafeWorkers - 5-Dec-17 @ 11:19 AM
My contract says I need to work within opening hours. I have worked mon to fri for 2years. They now want me to start a half day on Saturday, I am happy to do this but have plans and appointments made over next three Saturdays till Xmas is this reasonable amount of timeof notice as no mention of this before now.can I refuse until after Xmas.
Andy - 5-Dec-17 @ 6:32 AM
ROT_Z - Your Question:
I started working for a new company as office manager. Unfortunately the work is not coming in quick enough so I was reduced to 2.5 days a week. They can do this because in my contract it basically states they can do what they want with me to suit the needs of the company. Last Friday, they discussed in front of me just shutting the office for a month over Christmas. They were so blasie about doing it, like I would be able to cope fine with no money for a month, over Christmas. I assume due to the wording in my contract they can do this? Because it seems a little extreme and odd that I would have no protection at all in this circumstance? Thanks.

Our Response:
No you should get this checked out (ACAS or Citizens' Advice are good places to try). Employment contracts (in fact all contracts), must be "reasonable" - this doesn't sound reasonable at all.
SafeWorkers - 4-Dec-17 @ 3:35 PM
I started working for a new company as office manager. Unfortunately the work is not coming in quick enough so I was reduced to 2.5 days a week. They can do this because in my contract it basically states they can do what they want with me to suit the needs of the company. Last Friday, they discussed in front of me just shutting the office for a month over Christmas. They were so blasie about doing it, like I would be able to cope fine with no money for a month, over Christmas. I assume due to the wording in my contract they can do this? Because it seems a little extreme and odd that I would have no protection at all in this circumstance? Thanks.
ROT_Z - 4-Dec-17 @ 8:53 AM
My daughter has an 8 hour a week contract working Saturdays and Sundays, the employer puts the rota up on a Sunday for the following week. My daughter checks the rota and notes her working times. This week while she was in college all week they changed the already posted rota resulting in her shift changing. They said she has to come into work every day to check the rota - it would take her an hour every day to travel to work to do this. Shouldn’t they inform her of shift changes? Can they force you to come in to check a rota that is already posted?
barney - 2-Dec-17 @ 9:11 AM
Jenny - Your Question:
I work one Wednesday a month 9 to 6 other Wednesday are 9 to 1. My employers want me to change one of my 9 to 1 to 1 to 5. My childcare provider only takes the child once a week that’s my 9 to 6. If I have to change to my hrs to 1 to 5 I have to pay extra money to my childcare which will be what I earn that shift. Can they do this I’m a single mum

Our Response:
This depends on your employment contract really, does it give specific working hours? If so, your employer can't change these without your consent. See our guide here
SafeWorkers - 29-Nov-17 @ 12:17 PM
Paula - Your Question:
My partner and another has a contract to work nights theve been told the have to alternate one week days one week of nights , not able to book the odd night off as A/l.he asked for protective pay for loss of earnings , shift allowance and they have come back to him and said no to all and he was told to start day shift on Monday he has been with the company for 20yrs.

Our Response:
If his contract is for night shifts only his employer can't change this without his consent - see our guide to objecting to changes in an employment contract . If his contract states that he may work nights or days but he has worked nights for 20 years, then there's something called "custom and practice" that could vaguely be possible to use, but he'd have to seek professional help with this. A trade union should be able to assist, or try ACAS
SafeWorkers - 29-Nov-17 @ 12:15 PM
Hails - Your Question:
Hi I have worked for my employer for nearly 3 years and the rota does change for change of season but I have my rota for winter which has been in place for a couple of months but yesterday I was told I have to share my hours with someone from another area of the business and have to give up one shift a week for the next 3 weeks I am on a variable hour contract but can they force me to give my hours to someone else?

Our Response:
Is there are minimum number of hours in your contract? If so, and these are not met with the new arrangements, you can take action for breach of contract. Depedning on the nature of your contract, the new arrangements may or may not be acceptable. Without seeing the contract we can't really say. Contact ACAS with your contract to hand so you can refer to it.
SafeWorkers - 29-Nov-17 @ 12:07 PM
I work 7 nights on and 7 nights off Recently my boss has been cancelling nights here and there which disrupts my sleep pattern She usually only cancels around 4pm for a 8pm shift start Is this enough notice? I haven’t been given any new contract since I started in 2005 regarding cancelling of shifts,as this is the first time it has happened in 12 years.
cathie1208 - 29-Nov-17 @ 6:51 AM
I work one Wednesday a month 9 to 6 other Wednesday are 9 to 1. My employers want me to change one of my 9 to 1 to 1 to 5. My childcare provider only takes the child once a week that’s my 9 to 6. If I have to change to my hrs to 1 to 5 I have to pay extra money to my childcare which will be what I earn that shift. Can they do this I’m a single mum
Jenny - 28-Nov-17 @ 9:02 PM
My partner and anotherhas a contract to work nights theve been told the have to alternateone week days one week of nights , not able to book the odd night off as A/l.he asked for protective pay for loss of earnings , shift allowance and they have come back to him and said no to all and he was told to start day shift on Monday he has been with the company for 20yrs.
Paula - 28-Nov-17 @ 8:41 PM
Hi I have worked for my employer for nearly 3 years and the rota does change for change of season but I have my rota for winter which has been in place for a couple of months but yesterday I was told I have to share my hours with someone from another area of the business and have to give up one shift a week for the next 3 weeks I am on a variable hour contract but can they force me to give my hours to someone else?
Hails - 28-Nov-17 @ 6:33 PM
Bongo - Your Question:
I have a 12 hour contract, but my boss has tried to make me use some of my holidays to make my hours up to 12 as they say they have had some hours taken back from head office, can they use my hol8days to make up my contracted hours without my permission?

Our Response:
Your employer can say when you can and can't take holidays, but shouldn't use holidays as way of providing your contractual hours.
SafeWorkers - 28-Nov-17 @ 2:06 PM
john - Your Question:
Thank for your reply.but my boss as told me he as to give 3 months notice to landlord to close the newsagents.but no word about my redundancy or notice.my boss did say would I still work the newsagent if my bosses landlord takes over the newsagents. I didnt give him an answer.but if his landlord did take the newsagent over would I get my 12 years redundancy from my present boss?

Our Response:
If you're offered work in one of the other newsagents owned by your employer and within travelling distance, the chances of redundancy are slim. You might be better talking to ACAS or CAB where you can give specific details about yourself and your job.
SafeWorkers - 27-Nov-17 @ 2:54 PM
I have a 12 hour contract, but my boss has tried to make me use some of my holidays to make my hours up to 12 as they say they have had some hours taken back from head office, can they use my hol8days to make up my contracted hours without my permission?
Bongo - 27-Nov-17 @ 11:34 AM
I work for Yodel. I got the job through the job centre when Yodel had an open day. The only vacancies were for 3 days a week, Monday to Wednesday, at £70 a day for 9 hours work a day. I only wanted the 3 day a week because I have other commitments Thursday and Friday. So it suited me to do the job. However, firstly I noticed that I was being asked to deliver upwards of 75 parcels a day. Easy in a town, but my route is rural. Mid Wales rural! I refuse to jeopardise my driving licence by speeding, so my hours are getting longer but the day rate is the same. I have not been given, or signed, any sort of contract since I started in May. I do not get PPE equipment provided, ie hi viz, safety boots, torch (it's dark in the back of the van, especially when there are no street lights). I did not get sick pay when I was attacked by a dog whilst delivering a parcel that the owner of the dog knew was coming (because Yodel text and email people with a tracking number and a time of delivery) and I was told to get myself (!) to the hospital AFTER I'd finished my round. I was off for two weeks because I couldn't use my hand. I was told Monday morning that at peak season I have to work on a Sunday. I have refused, because nothing was said about this until the Monday morning! I have just had a text from the boss telling me he expects me to work Sunday. I assume I will get the sack Monday because I did not agree to working any other days in addition to the 3 days I was told about in the initial open day and subsequent interview for the part time job.
Baz - 24-Nov-17 @ 7:01 PM
Thank for your reply..but my boss as told me he as to give 3 months notice to landlord to close the newsagents....but no word about my redundancy or notice...my boss did say would i still work the newsagent if my bosses landlord takes over the newsagents. I didnt give him an answer...but if his landlord did take the newsagent over would i get my 12 years redundancy from my present boss?
john - 23-Nov-17 @ 10:40 PM
Hi looking for advice my son works in the private care sector.Once he had his rota can they give him an extra 24hour shift that's days & sleepin without even asking him first.He is contracted 3 twelve hour shifts one week and 4 shifts the next week which he already had these hours.He explained to his manager that he can not do this shift because he as made plans to go away the weekend as hewas not roted to work ,she told him she will try and get someone else to work the shift but fought if she will be able to.Am I within my rights to refuse to work the shift?Thank you
Shorty - 20-Nov-17 @ 11:12 PM
Lea - Your Question:
Hi.i work 17.5 hrs a week.i used to do Mon to Fri 6 til 9.30am. I went on maternity and requested if I could do my hours over four days because I couldn't get childcare cover on one of the days to which they agreed.As it stands today I've heard that a new building the company has acquired will be opening in 2 weeks.none of us have been told who will be cleaning this building and I heard that all the people from the building I presently clean will be moving into this new building which would leave mine empty and nothing to clean so because of this I'm afraid they will ask me to do this building which would be fine if it's the same size but it's bigger.On my day off at present another cleaner does the basic jobs in my building and this is all she can do because she has her own building to do too.they wouldn't be able to now do a bigger building when I'm off plus their own so either they will complain and this will prompt my employer to ask me to work Mon to Fri or they will do it off their own back.The problem is now is that I still wouldn't be able to get childcare for the day I'm currently off.where do I stand?

Our Response:
Firstly, ask what the new arrangements will be instead of worrying about what might happen. Secondly, was your contract changed when you agreed the new hours? If so, your employer cannot change these without your consent. Please see our guide Objecting to Changes in your Contract
SafeWorkers - 17-Nov-17 @ 12:31 PM
Hi.i work 17.5 hrs a week.i used to do Mon to Fri 6 til 9.30am. I went on maternity and requested if I could do my hours over four days because I couldn't get childcare cover on one of the days to which they agreed. As it stands today I've heard that a new building the company has acquired will be opening in 2 weeks.none of us have been told who will be cleaning this building and I heard that all the people from the building I presently clean will be moving into this new building which would leave mine empty and nothing to clean so because of this I'm afraid they will ask me to do this building which would be fine if it's the same size but it's bigger. On my day off at present another cleaner does the basic jobs in my building and this is all she can do because she has her own building to do too.they wouldn't be able to now do a bigger building when I'm off plus their own so either they will complain and this will prompt my employer to ask me to work Mon to Fri or they will do it off their own back. The problem is now is that I still wouldn't be able to get childcare for the day I'm currently off.where do I stand?
Lea - 16-Nov-17 @ 2:27 PM
Duckbay - Your Question:
I have a contract for 18.75 hours and from day 1 I have worked 37.5 hours for two years however only received Annual leave for my contractual hours of 18.75. Am I entitled to claim Annual leave for these additional hours?

Our Response:
Discuss this with your employer, if you have had no choice but to work these additional hours and thenyour employment contract should be changed to reflect that.
SafeWorkers - 15-Nov-17 @ 2:14 PM
I have been working a regular (nightly) 4 on 4 off shift pattern since 05/2017, my employer has now changed this pattern for the month 12/2017. I never received notice of this change, my contract however doesn’t stipulate working days just a set amount of hours. Can I refuse this change?
Jock - 15-Nov-17 @ 2:00 PM
I have been working at this company for over two years and this evening I have been asked to work via text in the morning, (less than 24 hours notice) even though on the rota it is my day off and I have said I can't I have plans, where does my employer stand with this? I have politely explained I can't and they have repeatedly asked.
Ena - 14-Nov-17 @ 10:29 PM
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    Re: When to Quit Your Job
    Your doctor can help. See what he/she has written on your certificate of capacity. If he/she says you have no capacity for work DON'T GO
    8 December 2017
  • lisa
    Re: When Your Employer Changes Your Working Hours
    Hi, my daughter has a 16 hrs contract at work, she has 2 children age 9&7, therefore claim child tax…
    7 December 2017
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