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Safe Working Temperatures

By: Kevin Watson MSc - Updated: 14 May 2019 | comments*Discuss
 
Safe Working Temperatures Cold Hot

Safe working temperatures are important in any workplace. Low temperatures, for instance, can be uncomfortable. A cold atmosphere creates dissatisfaction and complaints. Few people can focus properly on their work when they’re trying to stay warm.

Furthermore, in a cold workplace, staff may put on jumpers and jackets. In a shop, these may not fit with a retailer’s brand image. And in an office, heavy clothing can restrict movement when using computers.

At the other end of the scale, excess heat can cause drowsiness. This in turn may lead to sloppy or unfinished work. High temperatures cause Heat Stress and other health problems.

Minimum Temperatures

The minimum safe working temperatures recommended by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) are 13ºC and 16ºC.

The first of these applies to a workplace where there is physical activity. Such activity could be loading and stacking in a warehouse, or mobile work in a factory.

A minimum temperature of 16ºC applies to a sedentary workplace. This could be an office environment, a call centre or a public reception area.

Maximum Temperatures

Despite the difficulties associated with hot working environments, there is no legal maximum safe working temperature. The only requirement is that workplace temperatures in buildings should be reasonable. This condition appears in the Workplace Regulations 1992.

The Trades Union Congress (TUC) has gathered many examples of the effect of high temperatures. During hot summers, for example, employees are more prone to trip or slip. And those staff that work with computers often suffer from stress, tension and tiredness.

For manual workers, the effects of working in hot conditions are just as bad. The TUC has reports of fainting, dizziness and cramps. For some workers, the heat also places a dangerous burden on lungs and hearts.

Other common medical conditions associated with working in overheated workplaces include asthma, throat infections, and rhinitis.

Recommendations

In the absence of a legal ruling, the TUC has recommended maximum safe working temperatures. These are 27ºC for manual workers, and 30ºC for sedentary workers.

Controlling High Temperatures

In an office, employers may be able to keep the maximum temperature below 30ºC. They can do this with suitable ventilation and shades.

Suitable ventilation can take the form of air conditioning, open windows and fans. These measures can help to keep the air fresh. Stuffy air interferes with workers’ concentration, and can raise the temperature to uncomfortable levels.

If employers use air conditioning, they need to ensure that engineers regularly service and maintain the systems. Badly functioning air conditioning has led to examples of increased rather than lower temperatures.

Employers can also make staff more comfortable by allowing a sensible dress code and by ensuring there are regular breaks for cooling drinks.

Controlling safe working temperatures for people doing manual work outdoors in the heat is more difficult. The TUC suggests that such workers have regular breaks and drink a lot of water. It also proposes that management arranges for workers to rotate to jobs in shaded areas whenever possible.

Controlling Low Temperatures

In an office or shop, the obvious way to maintain the minimum safe working temperature is by using heaters.

For outdoor manual workers, employers should supply adequate warm clothing. Manual workers should also have frequent hot drinks.

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[Add a Comment]
Hi I am working for law company as a cleaner and preparing hot drinks for meetings.I am working in small kitchen without AC and the room is too hot 27 - 28C. even if I leave the door open.The meeting rooms are also too hot.People are often complaining that the AC is not working and the rooms are too hot.My manager doesn’t let me wear just a west and pocked tabard.I have to wear t-shirt with long or short sleeves but I feel too hot because the pocket tabard is made from strong fabric.I feel overheated every day .I have a heart valve problem and thyroid gland.What can I do ?
Kate - 14-May-19 @ 10:24 PM
I work in a school I work in the swimming area and the thermometer says 36 degrees it is so hot, what are my rights to this? Thanks Rhonda
Ronnie - 14-May-19 @ 1:20 PM
I work behind a bar at the weekend and in the summer my boss has decided we have to wear a uniform (a polo shirt and trousers) I'm perfectly okay wearing a uniform however he has decided that he wont be providing any kind of jumper and we also can't wear our own as he says its "scruffy". I'm constantly cold there even on the hottest days in the summer. I know the law says the temperatures have to be within a certain limit and I believe that by those standards everything is okay but regardless of whether or not IT'S not cold... I'M cold. Is he allowed to say that I'm not allowed to wear a cardigan or a jumper and am I within my rights to refuse to work if that's the case?
toocold - 23-Apr-19 @ 8:58 AM
I work in a mill cleaning for 4 hours in a morning, there is no air con and I'm not allowed a break, is there a law that states I cant go to the mills shop for a cold drink if it's too hot, as they say they won't pay me 4 hours if I have a break.
Vicky - 11-Apr-19 @ 3:24 PM
I work in a factory and the room I work in the air con does not work and it gets very hot and I have to wear a uniform and hat and long pants and the boss does not want to pay money getting it fix and they don’t allowed people to go home if it gets over 35
Ruby red - 23-Jan-19 @ 9:43 PM
I’m a palliative care nurse, work in patients homes overnight on a night shift. Most our patients turn heating off .Now it’s january overnight about 2 in the morning.The temp is dropping to 3 degrees... I’m absolutely freezing n feel like I can’t work properly as I’m too cold.What are my rights...
Jilli - 8-Jan-19 @ 7:05 PM
on code red days when the government is advising people you should stay in doors and be prepared to evacuate in case of bush fires how are we supposed to continue working? I travel for work and could quite easily get trapped by a fire should one occur I do my best to stay informed, children are sent home from school but what do parents do they can’t take time off because it’s to hot? What does the government expect parents to do with the children if they are legally required to work? I work in a variety of homes some don’t even have air conditioning should I expect my employer to buy there clients new air conditioners?
Blue - 5-Jan-19 @ 3:34 AM
Hi, I work in a warehouse, big shutter door always open, no heating at all.. I have asked if we could have heaters by our workstation but we're told no as the electric would cost too much as it would take forever to warm the place up.I'm dreading January as last year it was -4 inside the warehouse... What can I do?
Sarah - 14-Dec-18 @ 11:48 PM
Chatwins alsageron a main road has no heating ondoor open so fumes what can we do as customers
Ann - 11-Dec-18 @ 9:15 PM
I have staff that secure a car park for a university. There is a gatehouse for them to sit in but there is no heating because the generator is broken. With the temperature dropping as much as it is should I contact the HSE? My guys man the car park from 0530hrs until 2245hrs.
Scotty3984 - 29-Oct-18 @ 8:24 AM
I work in a shop where the heating broke in January and the area manager's only response was "jog on the spot" we have no heating on the shop floor and customers always complain about it being too cold for them, staff were frequently having to wear coats throughout the summer and now that it is approaching winter even with coats and thermal layers the temperature is becoming even more unbearable. Is this a reason to contact HSE?
Freezing - 27-Oct-18 @ 11:56 AM
I work in a care homeas a cleaner it's that got the sweat just drips off you and we can't go out for fresh air no more they stopped everyone going out
Dot - 8-Aug-18 @ 2:30 PM
Dotti - Your Question:
Hi I work in a part of a factory with no windows and up stairs I have two fans which are constantly blowing hot air around the temp at the highest has reached 39 and lowest 36 I had to take some holiday to have a day off from the heat as I find myself by 2pm confused and cant think straight although I finally got an air conditioning unit but unfortunately the temperature dint go below 34 and couldn't feel the benefit unless I was sat right on top of it, is working in this sort of heat ok? And I feel like why should I have to take my own holiday as I will be penalised for having a day off due to what the heat is doing to me at work

Our Response:
Talk to your employer about the effects of the heat on your performance. Your employer has a duty to make a suitable assessment of the risks to the health and safety of their employees, and take action where necessary and where reasonably practicable. If you do not feel your issue has been listened to, you can raise a formal grievance, ACAS can help with this if you do not have a formal grievance procedure.
SafeWorkers - 30-Jul-18 @ 12:47 PM
Unsureworker - Your Question:
Hi, I work in an industrial laundry for a large company. We work with large machinery that regularly uses steam and on a normal day the temperature is 27C so what is the maximum temperature that we can work in before we can get sent home

Our Response:
Despite the difficulties associated with hot working environments, there is no legal maximum safe working temperature. In the absence of a legal ruling, the TUC has recommended maximum safe working temperatures. These are 27ºC for manual workers, and 30ºC for sedentary workers. Contact your union rep for more information.
SafeWorkers - 30-Jul-18 @ 11:10 AM
ED - Your Question:
Hi, I work in a bakery in a very busy environment. We have two oven one small one big with the smaller one because 300 degrees and the larger ofbviluslg more. The temperature of the shop is hitting nearly 40 degrees. Air conditioning ain’t working and I’ve been complaining for months but nothing seems to be done. It’s maming me ill and I’m having black outs at work.

Our Response:
You should raise a formal grievance with your employer. If that doesn't resolve the issue contactHSE for advice on what to do next
SafeWorkers - 27-Jul-18 @ 10:36 AM
Hi I work in a part of a factory with no windows and up stairs I have two fans which are constantly blowing hot air around the temp at the highest has reached 39 and lowest 36 I had to take some holiday to have a day off from the heat as I find myself by 2pm confused and cant think straight although i finally got an air conditioning unit but unfortunately the temperature dint go below 34 and couldn't feel the benefit unless i was sat right on top of it, is working in this sort of heat ok? And I feel like why should I have to take my own holiday as I will be penalised for having a day off due to what the heat is doing to me at work
Dotti - 27-Jul-18 @ 9:21 AM
Hi, I work in an industrial laundry for a large company. We work with large machinery that regularly uses steam and on a normal day the temperature is 27C so what is the maximum temperature that we can work in before we can get sent home
Unsureworker - 27-Jul-18 @ 5:38 AM
I work cleaning buses in all conditions it don't matter if it's too hot or too cold .they don't seem to care .there answer is you work out sideso it is more or less so get on with it what are our rights
Maxi - 26-Jul-18 @ 2:21 PM
The fan does not make any difference as blowing out hot air as too hot. We do get water breaks, but when its constantly hot in the factory next to hot machines its difficult
ck560 - 26-Jul-18 @ 6:58 AM
Hi, I work in a bakery in a very busy environment. We have two oven one small one big with the smaller one because 300 degrees and the larger ofbviluslg more. The temperature of the shop is hitting nearly 40 degrees. Air conditioning ain’t working and I’ve been complaining for months but nothing seems to be done. It’s maming me ill and I’m having black outs at work.
ED - 26-Jul-18 @ 4:05 AM
CK560 - Your Question:
Hi, Work in a coffee factory where we roast and grind coffee.We have to wear ppe due to hygieneWith all this hot weather its causing us to sweat by 7am. What can we do? They have given fans which can only do so much in this heat.Asked for extra 15min break which they deem is not needed.

Our Response:
If the employer deems 15 mins is not necessary then be sure you are allowed to drink cold water when necessary/on the job. Are the fans making any difference?
SafeWorkers - 25-Jul-18 @ 3:46 PM
Hi, Work in a coffee factory where we roast and grind coffee. We have to wear ppe due to hygiene With all this hot weather its causing us to sweat by 7am. What can we do? They have given fans which can only do so much in this heat. Asked for extra 15min break which they deem is not needed.
CK560 - 25-Jul-18 @ 7:09 AM
I work in a pub with no air con only one entrance it’s capacity when full Wich mostly is on a Saturday is about 250 to 300 people there is no windows either the temperature is so high with body heat and fridges going is this allowed
Dawn - 24-Jul-18 @ 2:08 PM
mitch - Your Question:
Can you advise if employers are obliged to ensure that long distance wagon drivers have air conditioning in their cabs for these extreme temperatures.

Our Response:
There is nothing that specifically mentions the provision of air conditioning for long distance drivers butManagement of Health and Safety at Work regulations say that all employers have a general duty to protect the health and safety of the workforce under the Health and Safety at Work Act, and also to assess and control risks from working in hot temperatures, or exposure to the sun etc.
SafeWorkers - 24-Jul-18 @ 12:36 PM
Sweatyworker - Your Question:
Hi,I work in a locked mental health rehab. Windows have restrictors and doors are locked. We have no air con and our estates team have rejected our application for it. One of our patient bedrooms is 31degrees and other areas vary between 29 and 31 degrees. Myself and my team of housekeepers are doing a very active job and are finding it unbearable to strip and make beds, mop and generally clean. Offices are hot too as they are very small and some have no windows that open. It beggars belief why there is no maximum temp in certain sectors. Surely for a mental health rehab this heat is doing our patients no good. Everyone is lethargic and agitated!! I have an ongoing health issue to called Crohns disease where I struggle to stay hydrated, I'm trying to drink enough but I'm sweating far more than I'm drinking. Any advice?

Our Response:
If first line management has refused then refer to senior management. If that doesn't resolve your issue, raise a formal grievance with your employer. Talk to ACAS for advice on taking it further if you feel your health and safety is being severely compromised.
SafeWorkers - 24-Jul-18 @ 11:37 AM
I am 25 weeks pregnant and I am a cook in a busy canteen inside a factory, the temperature in the kitchen has started to hit 40 degrees and I am really starting to suffer, our air con doesn't barely work and a fan they have brought in is no use. I am completely exhausted tonight I couldn't even make it up the stairs when I got home because of the heat. Do you have any advice because I'm aware that there are no upper limits on workplace temperatures in place and I am worried about the safety of my unborn child.
Amzz - 23-Jul-18 @ 9:43 PM
can you advise if employers are obliged to ensure that long distance wagon drivers have air conditioning in their cabs for these extreme temperatures.
mitch - 23-Jul-18 @ 6:40 PM
Hi, I work in a locked mental health rehab. Windows have restrictors and doors are locked. We have no air con and our estates team have rejected our application for it. One of our patient bedrooms is 31degrees and other areas vary between 29 and 31 degrees. Myself and my team of housekeepers are doing a very active job and are finding it unbearable to strip and make beds, mop and generally clean. Offices are hot too as they are very small and some have no windows that open. It beggars belief why there is no maximum temp in certain sectors. Surely for a mental health rehab this heat is doing our patients no good. Everyone is lethargic and agitated!! I have an ongoing health issue to called Crohns disease where I struggle to stay hydrated, I'm trying to drink enough but I'm sweating far more than I'm drinking. Any advice?
Sweatyworker - 23-Jul-18 @ 3:19 PM
I work in a residential home, due to some dementia we can only have one door open , as i look after the elderly not all want there windows open either. I find myself perspiring the whole day, uniform wet, back cold and to make things worse i suffer with asthma and chest infections due to poor lung capacity ..i get home absolutely exhausted..temperature is 24 to 26 degrees....we all at work are feeling it...what can we do T
T - 9-Jul-18 @ 6:04 PM
We are working in a kitchen at a busy college, the temp has been unbearable. The supervisor doesn't feel the heat she feels the cold. ( she needs to eat) we are suffering being short staffed and running around like lunatics. Thurs this week I almost passed out and all I got from my boss was a shrug. I take iced drinks into work and also wet wipes as to stop me perspiring all the time. Sorry to moan but could do with some advice.
Caz - 8-Jul-18 @ 4:51 PM
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