Home > Workplace Safety > Being Pregnant at Work

Being Pregnant at Work

By: Abigail Taylor - Updated: 10 Oct 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Pregnancy Work Discrimination Health And

When you find out you are pregnant, you will no doubt be very busy organising everything for the arrival of your baby, from painting a nursery to buying baby clothes. However it is often easy to forget that you need to make preparations for your new baby at work too.

If you are working when you fall pregnant, you need to discuss your pregnancy with your employer so that you can both make necessary arrangements for any time you wish to take off, and to make any necessary adaptations to your work whilst you are pregnant.

Four Key Rights

Pregnant employees have four key rights:
  • Paid time off for ante-natal care
  • Maternity leave of at least 26 weeks, plus an optional additional 26 weeks, totalling a one year absence (dependent on how long you have worked for your current employer)
  • Maternity pay benefits - usually Statutory Maternity Pay or Maternity Allowance
  • Protection against Unfair Dismissal

Note: You are entitled to 26 weeks of maternity leave no matter how long you have worked for your current employer. However if you have worked for the same employer for 26 weeks by the 15th week before the beginning of the week that your baby is due, you will also be entitled to take up to a further 26 weeks additional maternity leave if you wish to do so.

You may start your Maternity Leave any time from 11 weeks before your due date. You will still accrue holiday entitlement during this time which, if you wish, you may add to the beginning or end of your maternity leave.

Telling Your Employer

You must tell your employer you are pregnant at least 15 weeks before the beginning of the week in which your baby's due (once you are approximately 5 months pregnant). However the sooner you tell them, the sooner you are able to make appropriate arrangements. Many women also prefer to tell their employer before 5 months, as it is often visibly obvious that they are pregnant before this date.

You should tell your employer when you want to start your Maternity Leave and receive Statutory Maternity Pay. You also need to tell your employer, as if there are any health problems or you need to take time off work for appointments, you cannot take any paid time off for ante-natal appointments before you have told them about your pregnancy. If you do take maternity leave, your employer will assume you are taking off the full amount you're entitled to, so if you intend coming back sooner, you need to give your employer at least 28 days' notice of your return.

Time Off for Ante-Natal Care

No matter how long you have worked in your current job, you are entitled to a reasonable amount of paid time off for ante-natal care. This must be at your normal rate of pay, and it is unlawful for an employer to refuse this right.

Hopefully you will have a healthy pregnancy. However even if there are no complications with your pregnancy, you will still need to attend a number of ante-natal appointments. These are usually staged as follows:

  1. First contact with healthcare professional
  2. 16 week appointment
  3. 18-20 week scan
  4. 28 week appointment
  5. 34 week appointment
  6. 36 weeks appointment
  7. 41 weeks appointment (if baby late)

As well as medical examinations, ante-natal care can include relaxation classes, for example, if recommended by your doctor. Where possible, however, you should try to schedule any appointments outside working hours or at the beginning or end of the day so you can work most of your usual hours.

Health and Safety Issues

Your employer must carry out a Risk Assessment of your job to identify any possible risks to you and your unborn child. These risks may be caused by:
  • Lifting or carrying heavy loads
  • Standing or sitting for long periods
  • Exposure to toxic substances
  • Long working hours

Your employer is then obliged to take reasonable steps to either remove the risk, or remove you from the risk (for example, by offering you suitable alternative work). If neither of these options are possible, your employer should suspend you from work on full pay.

If you think that you are at risk and your employer doesn't agree, you should first talk to your health and safety representative or a trade union official. Don't take risks with your baby's health; if you are worried, speak to your doctor. Your doctor may be able to write a letter to your employer to confirm what is a risk to you and your baby's health. If your employer still refuses to take action despite your concerns, you should inform the Health and Safety Executive.

Pregnancy Related Illness

If you have to take time off work due to a pregnancy related illness in the four weeks before your baby is due, your maternity leave will begin automatically, no matter what the previous agreement was with your employer.

Compulsory Maternity Leave

Even if you've decided not to take Statutory Maternity Leave, you must take off two weeks as soon as your baby is born, or four weeks if you work in a factory. This is not negotiable, and is a legal requirement under The Maternity (Compulsory Leave) Regulations1994.

Note: This compulsory maternity leave also takes effect if a child is still-born any time after 24 weeks of pregnancy.

If an employer allows or makes you work before two weeks have passed after the birth of your child (or four weeks in the case of factory workers), they will be in breach of the 1994 Regulations, and can be fined up to £500 per offence.

Discrimination and Pregnancy

It is unlawful Gender Discrimination for employers to treat pregnant women less favourably because they're pregnant or if they wish to take maternity leave. Such treatment includes:
  • Trying to reduce your hours without your permission
  • Suddenly giving you poor staff reports
  • Knowingly giving you unsuitable work
  • Making you redundant because you are pregnant
  • Treating days off sick because you are pregnant as a disciplinary issue
If your employer changes the terms and conditions of your employment whilst you're pregnant, without your express permission, they are in breach of contract. If your job ceases to exist whilst you are away on maternity leave, you must be offered suitable alternative employment. Alternative employment must:

  • Offer the same pay as your previous role
  • Have at least as favourable working days and hours
  • Have at least as favourable job prospects
  • Be in a suitable alternative location (i.e. not require you to move house if you do not wish to do so)
Some new parents wish to return to work on less hours than they previously worked. If you wish to make changes to your employment, either before or after Maternity or Paternity Leave, speak to your employer. They should consider any reasonable request (e.g. "Can I work 8:30-4:30?" or "Can I work 9-4 without a lunch break away from my desk?")

What to do if You Have Problems and Where to Seek Help

If you feel you are being denied your rights, first speak to your employer. If you have an employee representative - a trade union official for example, they may be able to help set out your complaint.If you are unable to reach an agreement with your employer, you may need to make a complaint using your employer's internal grievance procedure. If you're still unhappy, you may wish to take your case to an Employment Tribunal.

Your local Citizen's Advice Bureau and the Arbitration and Conciliation Service (ACAS) both offer free, impartial advice on this. You may also be able to get assistance with legal costs; speak to your local solicitor's office about what fee arrangements are available to you.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
Sc - Your Question:
I am currently 23 weeks pregnant and working in retail as a manager, as I have done for 6 years. Our store is usually very understaffed and people are always ringing in etc and I am always asked to do more shifts/hours at late notice (our store only runs on small contracts of 8 hours). this is fine however it has been agreed between me and my manager that I should not be heavy lifting (drinks, alcohol and tins etc). on most of my shifts I am told by other members of staff that higher members of staff have not been working hard and haven’t been seen on the shop floor for hours, meaning that all the heavy items are left for me to pick up for the night. I am left in a situation as to where I stand,Do I need to speak to HR services as I am usually left worrying and believe this is breeching my risk assessment? As I’m only on a small contract I’m worried that my hours will drop, is it possible that they can do this or is it based on an average. My average is 25)

Our Response:
Your contracted hours cannot be reduced without your consent - if this happens because of your pregnancy, it is discrimination. Your employer obliged to assess any risks to you while pregnant and take reasonable steps to either remove the risk, or remove you from the risk (for example, by offering you suitable alternative work). If neither of these options are possible, your employer should suspend you from work on full pay. The article above goes on further to state:
"It is unlawful Gender Discrimination for employers to treat pregnant women less favourably because they're pregnant or if they wish to take maternity leave. Such treatment includes:
Trying to reduce your hours without your permission
Suddenly giving you poor staff reports
Knowingly giving you unsuitable work
Making you redundant because you are pregnant
Treating days off sick because you are pregnant as a disciplinary issue
If your employer changes the terms and conditions of your employment whilst you're pregnant, without your express permission, they are in breach of contract. If your job ceases to exist whilst you are away on maternity leave, you must be offered suitable alternative employment. Alternative employment must:
Offer the same pay as your previous role
Have at least as favourable working days and hours
Have at least as favourable job prospects
Be in a suitable alternative location (i.e. not require you to move house if you do not wish to do so)"
SafeWorkers - 11-Oct-17 @ 11:18 AM
I am currently 23 weeks pregnant and working in retail as a manager, as I have done for 6 years. Our store is usually very understaffed and people are always ringing in etc and I am always asked to do more shifts/hours at late notice (our store only runs on small contracts of 8 hours).. this is fine however it has been agreed between me and my manager that I should not be heavy lifting (drinks, alcohol and tins etc).. on most of my shifts I am told by other members of staff that higher members of staff have not been working hard and haven’t been seen on the shop floor for hours, meaning that all the heavy items are left for me to pick up for the night. I am left in a situation as to where I stand, Do I need to speak to HR services as I am usually left worrying and believe this is breeching my risk assessment? As I’m only on a small contract I’m worried that my hours will drop, is it possible that they can do this or is it based on an average. My average is 25)
Sc - 10-Oct-17 @ 2:00 AM
scarlet- Your Question:
I'm 25 weeks pregnant. I work in a busy bar and restaurant. Twice a year we have a beer festival. This event is manic and unrelenting.My boss has put me on the main bar which is non stop for 4 days straight during this event instead of giving me an easier job.I ended up in hospital twice last week due to pain and severe vomiting. I've been diagnosed with a kidney infection and I'm scared working these shifts are going to put me back in hospital last. I also almost passed out at work last week.I'm worroad about questioning my boss on what work she is assigning me to next week. Need advice please.

Our Response:
Please follow the advice in the above article especially the section entitled "What to do if You Have Problems and Where to Seek Help"
SafeWorkers - 29-Sep-17 @ 3:24 PM
I'm 25 weeks pregnant. I work in a busy bar and restaurant. Twice a year we have a beer festival.This event is manic and unrelenting. My boss has put me on the main bar which is non stop for 4 days straight during this event instead of giving me an easier job. I ended up in hospital twice last week due to pain and severe vomiting.I've been diagnosed with a kidney infection and I'm scared working these shifts are going to put me back in hospital last. I also almost passed out at work last week. I'm worroad about questioning my boss on what work she is assigning me to next week.Need advice please.
scarlet - 28-Sep-17 @ 5:12 PM
Jade - Your Question:
I'm 9 weeks pregnant and have already told my boss I'm pregnant because I had really bad morning sickness, so if I did have any time of they'd know why. Today I've woken up with severe cramps and some spotting. I have work tonight but don't think I can go in. I'm really worried to phone in sick as have only been there 6 months and worried I will get sacked. Do you know what position this leaves me in? Tia

Our Response:
We can't really say, what your employer will do but if you are dismissed for reasons connected to your pregnancy, it is usually classed as discrimination and you should be able to take action.
SafeWorkers - 27-Sep-17 @ 3:04 PM
I'm 9 weeks pregnant and have already told my boss I'm pregnant because I had really bad morning sickness, so if I did have any time of they'd know why. Today I've woken up with severe cramps and some spotting. I have work tonight but don't think I can go in. I'm really worried to phone in sick as have only been there 6 months and worried I will get sacked. Do you know what position this leaves me in? Tia
Jade - 26-Sep-17 @ 9:37 AM
Lou - Your Question:
My boss wants me to work day 7 in a row because he's been let down by other staff members. I'm 22 weeks and found it very stressful yesterday, I'm getting a headache and stressed just worrying about what to do I need a rest day! I'm doing more than 9 hour shifts and working past 10 at night tidying up after messy customers, he has no sympathy for my pregnancy telling me off for snacking inbetween meals because I'm hungry 'it won't kill you or the baby to go hungry' getting me to over exhutst myself 'your pregnant not disabled' I don't know what to tell him to keep my day off, I need to rest and worried my job will be at risk

Our Response:
Please read the section in the article above entitled "Health and Safety Issues" for advice on what you can do.
SafeWorkers - 23-Aug-17 @ 10:55 AM
My boss wants me to work day 7 in a row because he's been let down by other staff members. I'm 22 weeks and found it very stressful yesterday, I'm getting a headache and stressed just worrying about what to do I need a rest day! I'm doing more than 9 hour shifts and working past 10 at night tidying up after messy customers, he has no sympathy for my pregnancy telling me off for snacking inbetween meals because I'm hungry 'it won't kill you or the baby to go hungry' getting me to over exhutst myself 'your pregnant not disabled' I don't know what to tell him to keep my day off, I need to rest and worried my job will be at risk
Lou - 21-Aug-17 @ 9:12 AM
Fancy1357 - Your Question:
Ever since I told my boss I was pregnant she cut my hours. I used to work 20-30 hours a week and now I'm working 3 hours a week. Is this wrong? Is there something I can do about it ?

Our Response:
What does your contract say? Are you still being paid? Are you on a zero hours contract? Sorry there's not really enough information to comment but hopefully the above article gives you sufficient information.
SafeWorkers - 10-Aug-17 @ 2:36 PM
Lauren- Your Question:
I am 22 weeks pregnant and have had morning sickness day (and night on and off) since week 7. Since becoming pregnant my work have become extremely understaffed therefor I have had to pick up the work load, I am a dental nurse so am on my feet all day! To begin with I was starting early, having reduced breaks ( if any) and finishing late. I have now told my employers I can no longer work more than my contracted hours as I am finding it extremely stressful (as well as still vomiting and nausea) this hasn't made a difference to my work load during the day as I am still rushed off my feet. I would also like to request to do shorter hours - maybe just start an hour later. I would just like advise please to if they have the right to refuse this and if they have the right to cut my pay as different websites state different things. X

Our Response:
Please see the section Health & Safety Issues in the above article. You may need to consult your doctor for advice on what kind of work and hours are acceptable and then negotiate with your employer. In general your employer should take steps to remove risks and you should not lose out because of it.
SafeWorkers - 25-Jul-17 @ 2:47 PM
I am 22 weeks pregnant and have had morning sickness day (and night on and off) since week 7. Since becoming pregnant my work have become extremely understaffed therefor I have had to pick up the work load, I am a dental nurse so am on my feet all day! To begin with I was starting early, having reduced breaks ( if any) and finishing late. I have now told my employers I can no longer work more than my contracted hours as I am finding it extremely stressful (as well as still vomiting and nausea) this hasn't made a difference to my work load during the day as I am still rushed off my feet. I would also like to request to do shorter hours - maybe just start an hour later... I would just like advise please to if they have the right to refuse this and if they have the right to cut my pay as different websites state different things. X
Lauren - 19-Jul-17 @ 3:24 PM
Ever since I told my boss I was pregnant she cut my hours. I used to work 20-30 hours a week and now I'm working 3 hours a week. Is this wrong? Is there something I can do about it ?
Fancy1357 - 11-Jul-17 @ 2:47 AM
Andrea - Your Question:
Hi, I am 7 weeks pregnant and I just recently got a new job that is open 24/7. And the employers expect everyone to at least work from 3-12:00am. By me being pregnant with my first baby I don't feel comfortable until that time at a loan agency, plus I need my rest for my health and my baby health. What should I do? Or is there a law for that?

Our Response:
Discuss this with your employer and also your doctor, see what they think is reasonable and whether there are any alternatives. If not follow the advice in the above article in the section "health and safety issues"
SafeWorkers - 27-Jun-17 @ 12:43 PM
Hi, I am 7 weeks pregnant and I just recently got a new job that is open 24/7. And the employers expect everyone to at least work from 3-12:00am. By me being pregnant with my first baby I don't feel comfortable until that time at a loan agency, plus I need my rest for my health and my baby health. What should I do? Or is there a law for that?
Andrea - 25-Jun-17 @ 2:19 PM
Linz83 - Your Question:
HiI am currently doing 10 hour shifts in over 27 degree's heat because of all the machinery etc behind the cafe counter. My employer is also still giving me duty manager shifts which involves walking up and down long hallways and 8 flights of stairs.If I take regular breaks the team can't manage without me and people come and get me off my breaks early. I'm emotional and exhausted. I am only four months pregnant and I couldn't afford to get a doctors note but not sure how I can go on.

Our Response:
Please see the section entitled "health and safety issues" in the above article.
SafeWorkers - 21-Jun-17 @ 12:20 PM
Hi I am currently 27 weeks pregnant.I have been a little sick in my pregnancy with diabetes and SPD.But i am now ok and really enjoying my being pregnant.Everyone in my team has been offered overtime (time and half pay) but when I put my request/availability down I was told I cannot do it due to my health.I have told my manager than I know I am more than capable of doing a few extra hours on a Saturday as I have a Friday off for my rest day.But he is not happy and is seeking advice from HR.He says my sickness record and health and safety measures put in place so far, shows that I should not be doing this. As I know I can and would like the opportunity to try, is there anything that I can do please as this is really upsetting me?I was also denied the right to accruing flexi time for this reason too. Any advise would be very much appreciated
DD - 21-Jun-17 @ 12:05 PM
Hi I am currently doing 10 hour shifts in over 27 degree's heat because of all the machinery etc behind the cafe counter. My employer is also still giving me duty manager shifts which involves walking up and down long hallways and 8 flights of stairs. If I take regular breaks the team can't manage without me and people come and get me off my breaks early. I'm emotional and exhausted. I am only four months pregnant and I couldn't afford to get a doctors note but not sure how I can go on.
Linz83 - 19-Jun-17 @ 2:22 PM
JW - Your Question:
Hi. I am a HGV driver. I had to tell my employer due to the manual handling and very long hours I do. I am 8 weeks on thursday.currently off work as they are doing a risk assessment on if I can still drive or not. My query is.I do regular overtime and have done for 2 1/2 years. Averaging about £300 extra a month. I know that I cannot work overtime whilst pregnant but I have also read that when your doing alternative duties it shouldn't decrease your rate of pay from what you were getting before you were pregnant. Any thoughts on if I should be getting my usual pay or if I don't have a leg to stand on? The time I need the money most I'm not allowed it. Typical. Ha. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you

Our Response:
We're not sure about this to be honest, but we think it's more likely that your existing salary (minus the overtime) would be the figure considered - check with ACAS on this. You maternity pay is usually based on your average pay in the months leading up to maternity leave.
SafeWorkers - 16-Jun-17 @ 10:27 AM
Hi. I am a HGV driver. I had to tell my employer due to the manual handling and very long hours I do. I am 8 weeks on thursday.currently off work as they are doing a risk assessment on if I can still drive or not. My query is . . . I do regular overtime and have done for 2 1/2 years. Averaging about £300 extra a month. I know that i cannot work overtime whilst pregnant but i have also read that when your doing alternative duties it shouldn't decrease your rate of pay from what you were getting before you were pregnant. Any thoughts on if I should be getting my usual pay or if I don't have a leg to stand on? The time I need the money most I'm not allowed it . . Typical. Ha. . Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you
JW - 13-Jun-17 @ 2:30 PM
I'm 28 weeks pregnant and expected to work 7 days in a row, all 8 hour shifts and only get one hour break all at once. When they did my risk assessment I asked if I cannot work 7 days in a row and they agreed. Can I refuse to work all 7 days?
Shelly123 - 21-May-17 @ 1:03 PM
Hi im 10 weeks pregnant first time im a care worker and i work in a care home i do 24 hours a week and i mostly do 1.45-8.00 in the evening shifts i told my manager few weeks ago that i get very tired and weak in tge evning along with feeling sick she said she will change my shifts to earlys which she did for one week however she has changed my shifts back to lates and iv told her i cannot do it as i feel weak in rhe evening but she said this is the rules of the home i cannot always have earlys. Im so fed up im pregnant i get lower back pain doing lat3 shifts what can i do??
Jay - 28-Apr-17 @ 10:52 AM
Lola - Your Question:
Hi I work as a support worker. I have also notified my employer about my pregnancy and he as done a risk assissment on me not to do any heavy lifting and giving personal etc.all you want me to do is the cleaning and taking the resident out for a walk. Because they were short of staff as need to me start working in the kitchen and no risk asssisment has been done for me working in the kitchen im really stress and tiered after standing for a long period my leg started to use and I'll start going back ache please any advice on what I should do?

Our Response:
Seek advice from your doctor or midwife. If they say the work is unsuitable you should tell your employer. Read the part of the article titled "Health and Safety Issues" for advice about what to do if they advise you not to work.
SafeWorkers - 20-Mar-17 @ 11:37 AM
Hey I'm 14 weeks pregnant I'm a barmaid and waitress, recently I've found my shifts feel like they are sooo long only working 5 hours 2 weekdays and then Friday Saturday. I'm always on late shifts like 3 pm to finish which is around 1.30/2am I get to sit down for 30 minutes each shift my legs hurt a lot of have pins and plates in one of my ankles and it's only recently started swelling when onit for long periods of time, I also get pains in my lower back and side that causes me to slow down abit I was on a 12 hour shift and sat down at the end of the night when customers were gone just to set a table and rest my feet for a moment and the owner seen me and complained about me to my manager which I got pulled up on even tho ther was no customers the bar was closed and I'd just covered a 12hr shift to cover for his bar....I've been experiencing some bleeding from the Cervix the last couple of weeks I rang work to ask for the day of as the doctor put me on bed rest I was due to start at 2 and my boss replied with rest until 6 then come in... I've miscarried before and I'm afraid it will happen again with the stress of working long hours having all these pains and also working in a busy environment that also puts stress on me, I just don't no what to do it feels like they aren't giving me any respect or working with me on certain things like ther are staff that come in 2/3 hours after me and are home by 11 and I'm always made to stay and do the late shifts, I feel like I'm complaining all the time to staff about silly things and being sore but I've already had to go to hospital 3 times in the pregnancy due to bleeding and had 4 scans just to be safe, no one understands that I'm sore tired And stressed about this never mind work issues adding to it.. What should I do??? Thanks
DeeDee - 18-Mar-17 @ 1:43 PM
Hi I work as a support worker.I have also notified my employer about my pregnancy and he as done a risk assissment on me not to do any heavy lifting and giving personal etc.......all you want me to do is the cleaning and taking theresident out for a walk. Because they were short of staffas need to me start working in the kitchen and no risk asssisment has been done for me working in the kitchen im really stress and tieredafter standing for a long period my leg started to use and I'll start going back ache please any advice onwhatI should do?
Lola - 17-Mar-17 @ 9:30 AM
C - Your Question:
Hi, I'm 22 weeks pregnant and experiencing discrimination by my immediate boss. He has given me a risk assessment but it's very poorly written and does not address the real risks to me or the baby. I'm an engineer and normally would climb ladders/work at height in a harness/work in confined spaces. He is still assigning me these tasks and says it's up to me to tell him if I feel fit enough to do them. thereby putting pressure on me to choose to do them still. The risk assessment does not say I can't do these tasks however many colleagues say I should not and review my risk assessment. He 'won't' change my risk assessment to reflect the true nature of climbing down ladders into confined spaces. I feel bullied.

Our Response:
If you're unhappy with the risk assessment you should say so. Make a formal complaint and if necessary get some support from your GP or midwife. If your employer has said to tell him if you do not feel up to the tasks, then tell him!
SafeWorkers - 27-Feb-17 @ 12:00 PM
Hi, I'm 22 weeks pregnant and experiencing discrimination by my immediate boss. He has given me a risk assessment but it's very poorly written and does not address the real risks to me or the baby. I'm an engineer and normally would climb ladders/work at height in a harness/work in confined spaces. He is still assigning me these tasks and says it's up to me to tell him if I feel fit enough to do them. thereby putting pressure on me to choose to do them still. The risk assessment does not say I can't do these tasks however many colleagues say I should not and review my risk assessment. He 'won't' change my risk assessment to reflect the true nature of climbing down ladders into confined spaces. I feel bullied.
C - 24-Feb-17 @ 10:09 PM
Hi there ! Ive been working at my job for two years now and i am a bartender/waitress i told my employer dec 16th about my pregnancy and my shifts have been cut i was working monday to friday but now they are only giving me three days a week. I told him i need my shifts cause i just bought a place with my boyfriend as well and i rely on my wage. After i spoke to him in his office and sent another message to him he has done nothing and has ignored me !! And has also hired another girl !! I am 18 weeks and by no means unable to work. What can i do ?
joe - 27-Jan-17 @ 6:55 AM
Hi i worked in x bar in my town one night a fight broke out and i was very forcefully pushed onto the bar whilst i was at work . I was pushed that hard it ruptured my waters and gave me and infection straight away which lead to me going into labour at 25 weeks and 5 days into my pregnancy it happens so quickly i was pushed at around 3 am and gave birth to our baby girl at 11.53 later that morning she weighed 1 lb 9 oz that was it thank fully after everything we have been through she has fought through vertually everything a premature baby can cat that would normally kill most premature baby's and she has survived . She is 14momths old now and still we are constantly in and out of hospital but slowly and surly things touch wood are getting better anyway a friend has brought it to my attention today that we should have a mega strongcase but we haven't a clue where to go from here please help :( my phone number is 07490295572 we look forward to speaking to you asap :)
princess mai - 21-Jan-17 @ 2:25 AM
Hi I am 12 weeks pregnant and I work at a nursing home my job title is activities aide and I have had 4 c sections this will be my 5th I told my supervisor I was having pain when I push the residents in there chairs she said OK and was acting like she was going to do everything so that I want have to push them well today she got upset with me when I told her I needed her help so I went toadministration and told her she said we only accommodate those who has been injured at the job and you might want to see how long you want to work because that's your job and for me to think about early maternity leave which I don't get paid for
Tori - 21-Jan-17 @ 12:15 AM
I'm 29 weeks pregnant and I work at a bingo hall and I have a sick note of the doctor saying I can't do the kitchen anymore but I got told I had to do a shift in there but I rang in sick for it as I couldn't do it I got told I need another sick note for that day so I just want to know if I have give a note to work to take me out of the kitchen is it against health and safety to put me in there ?
Nic - 13-Jan-17 @ 11:12 PM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments
  • Ricky
    Re: Going On Strike
    Hi me & colleagues would like to strike over pay but striking on certain duties we carry out in security. Would we be able to strike not doing…
    17 October 2017
  • SafeWorkers
    Re: Food Safety and the Law
    Patsie - Your Question:What is the law on wearing jewellery for a Barista (no food preparation only coffee making)?
    17 October 2017
  • SafeWorkers
    Re: When Your Employer Changes Your Working Hours
    Kaz - Your Question:I am a permanent member of staff who work shifts over 7 days. we have seasonal contract…
    17 October 2017
  • goodlady
    Re: Safe Working Temperatures
    I work in a care home, the heat is unbearable. There is no air conditioning,I work 12hr shifts, as soon as I walk unto the unit the…
    16 October 2017
  • poppy
    Re: When Your Employer Changes Your Working Hours
    i have worked in the same job for 14 years -tupe twice- my contracted working hours are 40 my employer is…
    16 October 2017
  • SafeWorkers
    Re: Can my Employer Fire Me?
    Eastlands - Your Question:I work in Transport,have a 37.5 hour weekly contract. Invariably on 2 days a week, I finish my…
    16 October 2017
  • SafeWorkers
    Re: General Workplace Safety
    Bones - Your Question:Evening, I am a contractor employed by a principle contractor under a CDM project. I have received an injury…
    16 October 2017
  • SafeWorkers
    Re: Food Safety and the Law
    Shar - Your Question:Are staff in fast food restaurants allowed to wear shorts?Our Response:As f
    16 October 2017
  • Patsie
    Re: Food Safety and the Law
    What is the law on wearing jewellery for a Barista (no food preparation only coffee making)?
    16 October 2017
  • Kaz
    Re: When Your Employer Changes Your Working Hours
    I am a permanent member of staff who work shifts over 7 days. we have seasonal contract hours (April…
    16 October 2017
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the SafeWorkers website. Please read our Disclaimer.