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Being Pregnant at Work

By: Abigail Taylor - Updated: 15 Mar 2018 | comments*Discuss
 
Pregnancy Work Discrimination Health And

When you find out you are pregnant, you will no doubt be very busy organising everything for the arrival of your baby, from painting a nursery to buying baby clothes. However it is often easy to forget that you need to make preparations for your new baby at work too.

If you are working when you fall pregnant, you need to discuss your pregnancy with your employer so that you can both make necessary arrangements for any time you wish to take off, and to make any necessary adaptations to your work whilst you are pregnant.

Four Key Rights

Pregnant employees have four key rights:
  • Paid time off for ante-natal care
  • Maternity leave of at least 26 weeks, plus an optional additional 26 weeks, totalling a one year absence (dependent on how long you have worked for your current employer)
  • Maternity pay benefits - usually Statutory Maternity Pay or Maternity Allowance
  • Protection against Unfair Dismissal

Note: You are entitled to 26 weeks of maternity leave no matter how long you have worked for your current employer. However if you have worked for the same employer for 26 weeks by the 15th week before the beginning of the week that your baby is due, you will also be entitled to take up to a further 26 weeks additional maternity leave if you wish to do so.

You may start your Maternity Leave any time from 11 weeks before your due date. You will still accrue holiday entitlement during this time which, if you wish, you may add to the beginning or end of your maternity leave.

Telling Your Employer

You must tell your employer you are pregnant at least 15 weeks before the beginning of the week in which your baby's due (once you are approximately 5 months pregnant). However the sooner you tell them, the sooner you are able to make appropriate arrangements. Many women also prefer to tell their employer before 5 months, as it is often visibly obvious that they are pregnant before this date.

You should tell your employer when you want to start your Maternity Leave and receive Statutory Maternity Pay. You also need to tell your employer, as if there are any health problems or you need to take time off work for appointments, you cannot take any paid time off for ante-natal appointments before you have told them about your pregnancy. If you do take maternity leave, your employer will assume you are taking off the full amount you're entitled to, so if you intend coming back sooner, you need to give your employer at least 28 days' notice of your return.

Time Off for Ante-Natal Care

No matter how long you have worked in your current job, you are entitled to a reasonable amount of paid time off for ante-natal care. This must be at your normal rate of pay, and it is unlawful for an employer to refuse this right.

Hopefully you will have a healthy pregnancy. However even if there are no complications with your pregnancy, you will still need to attend a number of ante-natal appointments. These are usually staged as follows:

  1. First contact with healthcare professional
  2. 16 week appointment
  3. 18-20 week scan
  4. 28 week appointment
  5. 34 week appointment
  6. 36 weeks appointment
  7. 41 weeks appointment (if baby late)

As well as medical examinations, ante-natal care can include relaxation classes, for example, if recommended by your doctor. Where possible, however, you should try to schedule any appointments outside working hours or at the beginning or end of the day so you can work most of your usual hours.

Health and Safety Issues

Your employer must carry out a Risk Assessment of your job to identify any possible risks to you and your unborn child. These risks may be caused by:
  • Lifting or carrying heavy loads
  • Standing or sitting for long periods
  • Exposure to toxic substances
  • Long working hours

Your employer is then obliged to take reasonable steps to either remove the risk, or remove you from the risk (for example, by offering you suitable alternative work). If neither of these options are possible, your employer should suspend you from work on full pay.

If you think that you are at risk and your employer doesn't agree, you should first talk to your health and safety representative or a trade union official. Don't take risks with your baby's health; if you are worried, speak to your doctor. Your doctor may be able to write a letter to your employer to confirm what is a risk to you and your baby's health. If your employer still refuses to take action despite your concerns, you should inform the Health and Safety Executive.

Pregnancy Related Illness

If you have to take time off work due to a pregnancy related illness in the four weeks before your baby is due, your maternity leave will begin automatically, no matter what the previous agreement was with your employer.

Compulsory Maternity Leave

Even if you've decided not to take Statutory Maternity Leave, you must take off two weeks as soon as your baby is born, or four weeks if you work in a factory. This is not negotiable, and is a legal requirement under The Maternity (Compulsory Leave) Regulations1994.

Note: This compulsory maternity leave also takes effect if a child is still-born any time after 24 weeks of pregnancy.

If an employer allows or makes you work before two weeks have passed after the birth of your child (or four weeks in the case of factory workers), they will be in breach of the 1994 Regulations, and can be fined up to £500 per offence.

Discrimination and Pregnancy

It is unlawful Gender Discrimination for employers to treat pregnant women less favourably because they're pregnant or if they wish to take maternity leave. Such treatment includes:
  • Trying to reduce your hours without your permission
  • Suddenly giving you poor staff reports
  • Knowingly giving you unsuitable work
  • Making you redundant because you are pregnant
  • Treating days off sick because you are pregnant as a disciplinary issue
If your employer changes the terms and conditions of your employment whilst you're pregnant, without your express permission, they are in breach of contract. If your job ceases to exist whilst you are away on maternity leave, you must be offered suitable alternative employment. Alternative employment must:

  • Offer the same pay as your previous role
  • Have at least as favourable working days and hours
  • Have at least as favourable job prospects
  • Be in a suitable alternative location (i.e. not require you to move house if you do not wish to do so)
Some new parents wish to return to work on less hours than they previously worked. If you wish to make changes to your employment, either before or after Maternity or Paternity Leave, speak to your employer. They should consider any reasonable request (e.g. "Can I work 8:30-4:30?" or "Can I work 9-4 without a lunch break away from my desk?")

What to do if You Have Problems and Where to Seek Help

If you feel you are being denied your rights, first speak to your employer. If you have an employee representative - a trade union official for example, they may be able to help set out your complaint.If you are unable to reach an agreement with your employer, you may need to make a complaint using your employer's internal grievance procedure. If you're still unhappy, you may wish to take your case to an Employment Tribunal.

Your local Citizen's Advice Bureau and the Arbitration and Conciliation Service (ACAS) both offer free, impartial advice on this. You may also be able to get assistance with legal costs; speak to your local solicitor's office about what fee arrangements are available to you.

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[Add a Comment]
Monika - Your Question:
Hi ,im currently 20 weeks pregnant and I work as a mental health support worker on awake nights. My contract is 2 in 2 off ( apporx 48h/week ). After informing my employer about my pregnancy and few meetings I had to place a grievance letter which finally has fallowed with risk assessment. As an alternative at first they have offered me 2 days in 2 days off ( 12h each day ) which I have accepted. My acceptance were fallowed by another meeting on which they have offered me work for 7 days a week in total of 46h per week (3 days of 4h work each day plus travel time ; 2 days 8h work which is 22 miles away from my living place and takes me 2-3h of public transport , 2 days off 11h 30 minutes with 2 hours each way of public transport 12 miles away from my living place ). I do not drive a car which my employer knows. I use to be riding a motor scooter to work till I had an accident. My job was located about a mile away from my home and when applying for my position I were told about location that was up to5 miles from my home. ImNot feeling comfortable about long travels and no day off at all. As its mental health despite what they say I have no breaks apart from 30 minutes travel time between two customers. Travel and child care cost ll consume half of my salary at this point otherwise im forced to go on a two wheeler. I spoke already with my employer and thats the only alternative they can offer me. Is there anything else I can do ? Im finding that insane really. All this situation since I have infor them about my pregnancy makes me very distressed and mentally exhausted.

Our Response:
Answer is in the article above, please read sections entitled "Health and Safety Issues" and "Discrimination and Pregnancy"
SafeWorkers - 16-Mar-18 @ 12:35 PM
Hi ,im currently 20 weeks pregnant and i work as a mental health support worker on awake nights. My contract is 2 in 2 off ( apporx 48h/week ) . After informing my employer about my pregnancy and few meetings i had to place a grievance letter which finally has fallowed with risk assessment. As an alternative at first they have offered me 2 days in 2 days off ( 12h each day ) which i have accepted. My acceptance were fallowed by another meeting on which they have offered me work for 7 days a week in total of 46h per week (3 days of 4h work each day plus travel time ; 2 days 8h work which is 22 miles away from my living place and takes me 2-3h of public transport , 2 days off 11h 30 minutes with 2 hours each way of public transport 12 miles away from my living place ) . I do not drive a car which my employer knows. I use to be riding a motor scooter to work till i had an accident. My job was located about a mile away from my home and when applying for my position i were told about location that was up to5 miles from my home . Im Not feeling comfortable about long travels and no day off at all. As its mental health despite what they say i have no breaks apart from 30 minutes travel time between two customers. Travel and child care cost ll consume half of my salary at this point otherwise im forced to go on a two wheeler . I spoke already with my employer and thats the only alternative they can offer me . Is there anything else i can do ? Im finding that insane really. All this situation since i have infor them about my pregnancy makes me very distressed and mentally exhausted.
Monika - 14-Mar-18 @ 10:48 PM
I am 26 weeks pregnant and I have type 2 diabetes which means I have to take 2 different types of insulin as pregnancy has made it very hard to manage, I have PGP which means I have to use crutches to help me get around and I am in a lot of pain when I stand or sit for long periods. Where I work I am expected to lone work and do long hours. I have had a risk assessment but have been told these things aren't an issue however I have been told by other people I should not be allowed to lone work. Do you have any advice.
Candice - 7-Mar-18 @ 10:38 PM
Hi I'm 29 weeks pregnantI work as an home carer I phoned yesterday to say I feel very unsafe to work in this beast from the east I couldn't get my car out I had to walk 4 mile to a call in snow I've now pulled my lower stomach muscles and all groin area are the liabile for not letting me have off also saying we are all in sand boat no one else is pregnant felt pressured to work no in loafs of pain
Sr - 1-Mar-18 @ 2:54 PM
Cat - Your Question:
I work for waffle house and we are required to work Christmas which is the busiest day of the year which for the past 3 years that I have worked there the hour requirement has only been 8 and now they are making everyone work 12 hours. I'm 36 weeks pregnant and can't work more then 8 hours without being in excruciating pain and have spoken to them about this multiple times they say even if I bring in a doctor's note I still have to work 12 hours or you have to quit or be fired I don't know what to do

Our Response:
If you are on a standard employment contract your employer cannot do this as it's discrimination. Please see the section in the above article entitled "discrimination and pregnancy" for details of what your employer is supposed to do to help you and also the steps you can take if you feel you have been discriminated against.
SafeWorkers - 19-Dec-17 @ 3:44 PM
I work for waffle house and we are required to work Christmas which is the busiest day of the year which for the past 3 years that I have worked there the hour requirement has only been 8 and now they are making everyone work 12 hours. I'm 36 weeks pregnant and can't work more then 8 hours without being in excruciating pain and have spoken to them about this multiple times they say even if I bring in a doctor's note I still have to work 12 hours or you have to quit or be fired I don't know what to do
Cat - 17-Dec-17 @ 8:42 PM
Tiger92 - Your Question:
Hello I'm 29 weeks pregnant work as a carer. Work have not been out and done a risk assessment I'm also still bending down on the floor and boosting patients from the floor also change my working hours with out telling me. Was meant to finish at 8pm no staff turned up rang on call and said I have to stay till 8:30. Are they allowed to do this and can I refuse?

Our Response:
You should talk to your employer first. If you have no success, follow the steps in the above article from the section entitled "Health and Safety Issues" onwards.
SafeWorkers - 25-Oct-17 @ 11:38 AM
Hello I'm 29 weeks pregnant work as a carer. Work have not been out and done a risk assessment I'm also still bending down on the floor and boosting patients from the floor also change my working hours with out telling me. Was meant to finish at 8pm no staff turned up rang on call and said I have to stay till 8:30. Are they allowed to do this and can I refuse?
Tiger92 - 22-Oct-17 @ 10:14 PM
Josh- Your Question:
Hi, My pregnant wife of 27 weeks is working ridiculous hours, she goes out the house at 7am and finished work at 6pm. Her replacement is already on the job and knows the ful role now, so she’s just sitting around and doing nothing, she sits down for all them hours behind a desk answering calls-dealing with customers in with transport etc, she’s works in transport logistics- they have stopped her from going in the warehouse which I can’t fault them for. She’s now in pain with her back constantly, like shooting pains and sometimes she can’t even stand, I can’t remeber what it’s called. I’ve told her to take maternity in November, she was meant to get it at 2nd December due on the 12th January. But she’s not capable anymore to do it, it’s killing her and it’s a stressful job where’s she’s at asking customers shouting at her. And it’s gets her upset and stress for her, we’ve been hospital for non movement but as soon as we got there he moved ha, always the case. And now she asked today and the head office has said she can. then her main manager at her depot has said no because he and another college (he’s mates son) is off at the same time? So there making her go in another room alone and sit with a laptop and phone until her actual date Is there any advice please? So I can help her? Thankyou.

Our Response:
See the section of the above article under health and safety, where it mentions standing or sitting for long hours. The employer must take reasonable steps to alleviate any potential health/safety issues, if this is not possible, the employer must suspend her from work on full pay etc
SafeWorkers - 20-Oct-17 @ 11:13 AM
Hi, My pregnant wife of 27 weeks is working ridiculous hours, she goes out the house at 7am and finished work at 6pm. Her replacement is already on the job and knows the ful role now, so she’s just sitting around and doing nothing, she sits down for all them hours behind a desk answering calls-dealing with customers in with transport etc, she’s works in transport logistics- they have stopped her from going in the warehouse which I can’t fault them for. She’s now in pain with her back constantly, like shooting pains and sometimes she can’t even stand, I can’t remeber what it’s called. I’ve told her to take maternity in November, she was meant to get it at 2nd December due on the 12th January. But she’s not capable anymore to do it, it’s killing her and it’s a stressful job where’s she’s at asking customers shouting at her. And it’s gets her upset and stress for her, we’ve been hospital for non movement but as soon as we got there he moved ha, always the case. And now she asked today and the head office has said she can... then her main manager at her depot has said no because he and another college (he’s mates son) is off at the same time? So there making her go in another room alone and sit with a laptop and phone until her actual date Is there any advice please? So I can help her? Thankyou.
Josh - 17-Oct-17 @ 5:29 PM
Sc - Your Question:
I am currently 23 weeks pregnant and working in retail as a manager, as I have done for 6 years. Our store is usually very understaffed and people are always ringing in etc and I am always asked to do more shifts/hours at late notice (our store only runs on small contracts of 8 hours). this is fine however it has been agreed between me and my manager that I should not be heavy lifting (drinks, alcohol and tins etc). on most of my shifts I am told by other members of staff that higher members of staff have not been working hard and haven’t been seen on the shop floor for hours, meaning that all the heavy items are left for me to pick up for the night. I am left in a situation as to where I stand,Do I need to speak to HR services as I am usually left worrying and believe this is breeching my risk assessment? As I’m only on a small contract I’m worried that my hours will drop, is it possible that they can do this or is it based on an average. My average is 25)

Our Response:
Your contracted hours cannot be reduced without your consent - if this happens because of your pregnancy, it is discrimination. Your employer obliged to assess any risks to you while pregnant and take reasonable steps to either remove the risk, or remove you from the risk (for example, by offering you suitable alternative work). If neither of these options are possible, your employer should suspend you from work on full pay. The article above goes on further to state:
"It is unlawful Gender Discrimination for employers to treat pregnant women less favourably because they're pregnant or if they wish to take maternity leave. Such treatment includes:
Trying to reduce your hours without your permission
Suddenly giving you poor staff reports
Knowingly giving you unsuitable work
Making you redundant because you are pregnant
Treating days off sick because you are pregnant as a disciplinary issue
If your employer changes the terms and conditions of your employment whilst you're pregnant, without your express permission, they are in breach of contract. If your job ceases to exist whilst you are away on maternity leave, you must be offered suitable alternative employment. Alternative employment must:
Offer the same pay as your previous role
Have at least as favourable working days and hours
Have at least as favourable job prospects
Be in a suitable alternative location (i.e. not require you to move house if you do not wish to do so)"
SafeWorkers - 11-Oct-17 @ 11:18 AM
I am currently 23 weeks pregnant and working in retail as a manager, as I have done for 6 years. Our store is usually very understaffed and people are always ringing in etc and I am always asked to do more shifts/hours at late notice (our store only runs on small contracts of 8 hours).. this is fine however it has been agreed between me and my manager that I should not be heavy lifting (drinks, alcohol and tins etc).. on most of my shifts I am told by other members of staff that higher members of staff have not been working hard and haven’t been seen on the shop floor for hours, meaning that all the heavy items are left for me to pick up for the night. I am left in a situation as to where I stand, Do I need to speak to HR services as I am usually left worrying and believe this is breeching my risk assessment? As I’m only on a small contract I’m worried that my hours will drop, is it possible that they can do this or is it based on an average. My average is 25)
Sc - 10-Oct-17 @ 2:00 AM
scarlet- Your Question:
I'm 25 weeks pregnant. I work in a busy bar and restaurant. Twice a year we have a beer festival. This event is manic and unrelenting.My boss has put me on the main bar which is non stop for 4 days straight during this event instead of giving me an easier job.I ended up in hospital twice last week due to pain and severe vomiting. I've been diagnosed with a kidney infection and I'm scared working these shifts are going to put me back in hospital last. I also almost passed out at work last week.I'm worroad about questioning my boss on what work she is assigning me to next week. Need advice please.

Our Response:
Please follow the advice in the above article especially the section entitled "What to do if You Have Problems and Where to Seek Help"
SafeWorkers - 29-Sep-17 @ 3:24 PM
I'm 25 weeks pregnant. I work in a busy bar and restaurant. Twice a year we have a beer festival.This event is manic and unrelenting. My boss has put me on the main bar which is non stop for 4 days straight during this event instead of giving me an easier job. I ended up in hospital twice last week due to pain and severe vomiting.I've been diagnosed with a kidney infection and I'm scared working these shifts are going to put me back in hospital last. I also almost passed out at work last week. I'm worroad about questioning my boss on what work she is assigning me to next week.Need advice please.
scarlet - 28-Sep-17 @ 5:12 PM
Jade - Your Question:
I'm 9 weeks pregnant and have already told my boss I'm pregnant because I had really bad morning sickness, so if I did have any time of they'd know why. Today I've woken up with severe cramps and some spotting. I have work tonight but don't think I can go in. I'm really worried to phone in sick as have only been there 6 months and worried I will get sacked. Do you know what position this leaves me in? Tia

Our Response:
We can't really say, what your employer will do but if you are dismissed for reasons connected to your pregnancy, it is usually classed as discrimination and you should be able to take action.
SafeWorkers - 27-Sep-17 @ 3:04 PM
I'm 9 weeks pregnant and have already told my boss I'm pregnant because I had really bad morning sickness, so if I did have any time of they'd know why. Today I've woken up with severe cramps and some spotting. I have work tonight but don't think I can go in. I'm really worried to phone in sick as have only been there 6 months and worried I will get sacked. Do you know what position this leaves me in? Tia
Jade - 26-Sep-17 @ 9:37 AM
Lou - Your Question:
My boss wants me to work day 7 in a row because he's been let down by other staff members. I'm 22 weeks and found it very stressful yesterday, I'm getting a headache and stressed just worrying about what to do I need a rest day! I'm doing more than 9 hour shifts and working past 10 at night tidying up after messy customers, he has no sympathy for my pregnancy telling me off for snacking inbetween meals because I'm hungry 'it won't kill you or the baby to go hungry' getting me to over exhutst myself 'your pregnant not disabled' I don't know what to tell him to keep my day off, I need to rest and worried my job will be at risk

Our Response:
Please read the section in the article above entitled "Health and Safety Issues" for advice on what you can do.
SafeWorkers - 23-Aug-17 @ 10:55 AM
My boss wants me to work day 7 in a row because he's been let down by other staff members. I'm 22 weeks and found it very stressful yesterday, I'm getting a headache and stressed just worrying about what to do I need a rest day! I'm doing more than 9 hour shifts and working past 10 at night tidying up after messy customers, he has no sympathy for my pregnancy telling me off for snacking inbetween meals because I'm hungry 'it won't kill you or the baby to go hungry' getting me to over exhutst myself 'your pregnant not disabled' I don't know what to tell him to keep my day off, I need to rest and worried my job will be at risk
Lou - 21-Aug-17 @ 9:12 AM
Fancy1357 - Your Question:
Ever since I told my boss I was pregnant she cut my hours. I used to work 20-30 hours a week and now I'm working 3 hours a week. Is this wrong? Is there something I can do about it ?

Our Response:
What does your contract say? Are you still being paid? Are you on a zero hours contract? Sorry there's not really enough information to comment but hopefully the above article gives you sufficient information.
SafeWorkers - 10-Aug-17 @ 2:36 PM
Lauren- Your Question:
I am 22 weeks pregnant and have had morning sickness day (and night on and off) since week 7. Since becoming pregnant my work have become extremely understaffed therefor I have had to pick up the work load, I am a dental nurse so am on my feet all day! To begin with I was starting early, having reduced breaks ( if any) and finishing late. I have now told my employers I can no longer work more than my contracted hours as I am finding it extremely stressful (as well as still vomiting and nausea) this hasn't made a difference to my work load during the day as I am still rushed off my feet. I would also like to request to do shorter hours - maybe just start an hour later. I would just like advise please to if they have the right to refuse this and if they have the right to cut my pay as different websites state different things. X

Our Response:
Please see the section Health & Safety Issues in the above article. You may need to consult your doctor for advice on what kind of work and hours are acceptable and then negotiate with your employer. In general your employer should take steps to remove risks and you should not lose out because of it.
SafeWorkers - 25-Jul-17 @ 2:47 PM
I am 22 weeks pregnant and have had morning sickness day (and night on and off) since week 7. Since becoming pregnant my work have become extremely understaffed therefor I have had to pick up the work load, I am a dental nurse so am on my feet all day! To begin with I was starting early, having reduced breaks ( if any) and finishing late. I have now told my employers I can no longer work more than my contracted hours as I am finding it extremely stressful (as well as still vomiting and nausea) this hasn't made a difference to my work load during the day as I am still rushed off my feet. I would also like to request to do shorter hours - maybe just start an hour later... I would just like advise please to if they have the right to refuse this and if they have the right to cut my pay as different websites state different things. X
Lauren - 19-Jul-17 @ 3:24 PM
Ever since I told my boss I was pregnant she cut my hours. I used to work 20-30 hours a week and now I'm working 3 hours a week. Is this wrong? Is there something I can do about it ?
Fancy1357 - 11-Jul-17 @ 2:47 AM
Andrea - Your Question:
Hi, I am 7 weeks pregnant and I just recently got a new job that is open 24/7. And the employers expect everyone to at least work from 3-12:00am. By me being pregnant with my first baby I don't feel comfortable until that time at a loan agency, plus I need my rest for my health and my baby health. What should I do? Or is there a law for that?

Our Response:
Discuss this with your employer and also your doctor, see what they think is reasonable and whether there are any alternatives. If not follow the advice in the above article in the section "health and safety issues"
SafeWorkers - 27-Jun-17 @ 12:43 PM
Hi, I am 7 weeks pregnant and I just recently got a new job that is open 24/7. And the employers expect everyone to at least work from 3-12:00am. By me being pregnant with my first baby I don't feel comfortable until that time at a loan agency, plus I need my rest for my health and my baby health. What should I do? Or is there a law for that?
Andrea - 25-Jun-17 @ 2:19 PM
Linz83 - Your Question:
HiI am currently doing 10 hour shifts in over 27 degree's heat because of all the machinery etc behind the cafe counter. My employer is also still giving me duty manager shifts which involves walking up and down long hallways and 8 flights of stairs.If I take regular breaks the team can't manage without me and people come and get me off my breaks early. I'm emotional and exhausted. I am only four months pregnant and I couldn't afford to get a doctors note but not sure how I can go on.

Our Response:
Please see the section entitled "health and safety issues" in the above article.
SafeWorkers - 21-Jun-17 @ 12:20 PM
Hi I am currently 27 weeks pregnant.I have been a little sick in my pregnancy with diabetes and SPD.But i am now ok and really enjoying my being pregnant.Everyone in my team has been offered overtime (time and half pay) but when I put my request/availability down I was told I cannot do it due to my health.I have told my manager than I know I am more than capable of doing a few extra hours on a Saturday as I have a Friday off for my rest day.But he is not happy and is seeking advice from HR.He says my sickness record and health and safety measures put in place so far, shows that I should not be doing this. As I know I can and would like the opportunity to try, is there anything that I can do please as this is really upsetting me?I was also denied the right to accruing flexi time for this reason too. Any advise would be very much appreciated
DD - 21-Jun-17 @ 12:05 PM
Hi I am currently doing 10 hour shifts in over 27 degree's heat because of all the machinery etc behind the cafe counter. My employer is also still giving me duty manager shifts which involves walking up and down long hallways and 8 flights of stairs. If I take regular breaks the team can't manage without me and people come and get me off my breaks early. I'm emotional and exhausted. I am only four months pregnant and I couldn't afford to get a doctors note but not sure how I can go on.
Linz83 - 19-Jun-17 @ 2:22 PM
JW - Your Question:
Hi. I am a HGV driver. I had to tell my employer due to the manual handling and very long hours I do. I am 8 weeks on thursday.currently off work as they are doing a risk assessment on if I can still drive or not. My query is.I do regular overtime and have done for 2 1/2 years. Averaging about £300 extra a month. I know that I cannot work overtime whilst pregnant but I have also read that when your doing alternative duties it shouldn't decrease your rate of pay from what you were getting before you were pregnant. Any thoughts on if I should be getting my usual pay or if I don't have a leg to stand on? The time I need the money most I'm not allowed it. Typical. Ha. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you

Our Response:
We're not sure about this to be honest, but we think it's more likely that your existing salary (minus the overtime) would be the figure considered - check with ACAS on this. You maternity pay is usually based on your average pay in the months leading up to maternity leave.
SafeWorkers - 16-Jun-17 @ 10:27 AM
Hi. I am a HGV driver. I had to tell my employer due to the manual handling and very long hours I do. I am 8 weeks on thursday.currently off work as they are doing a risk assessment on if I can still drive or not. My query is . . . I do regular overtime and have done for 2 1/2 years. Averaging about £300 extra a month. I know that i cannot work overtime whilst pregnant but i have also read that when your doing alternative duties it shouldn't decrease your rate of pay from what you were getting before you were pregnant. Any thoughts on if I should be getting my usual pay or if I don't have a leg to stand on? The time I need the money most I'm not allowed it . . Typical. Ha. . Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you
JW - 13-Jun-17 @ 2:30 PM
I'm 28 weeks pregnant and expected to work 7 days in a row, all 8 hour shifts and only get one hour break all at once. When they did my risk assessment I asked if I cannot work 7 days in a row and they agreed. Can I refuse to work all 7 days?
Shelly123 - 21-May-17 @ 1:03 PM
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